Tag: Rye Flour

Breads of Europe | Dinkel, Einkorn, Roggenbrot mit Walnüssen und Gerstel Sauerteig (spelt, einkorn, rye bread with walnuts and barley leaven)

SWITZERLAND

Gerstel Sauerteig (barley sourdough)

  • 300 g + 150 g rye flour
  • 100 ml water, lukewarm
  • 50 g barley flour
  • 50 ml water, lukewarm

This leaven has three stages.

First, mix 50 grams of barley with 50 millilitres of lukewarm water, leave to ferment covered with a damp cloth for 24 hours.

Second, mix 150 grams of rye flour with 100 millilitres of lukewarm water, add to the first mixture and leave to ferment for 12 hours.

Third, hold back 100 grams of this mixture, and add 300 grams of rye flour to make a dry crumbly starter. It will keep for weeks, and is reconstituted with an equal amount of water, then with rye and water to start the process all over again.

Final Dough

  • 450 g white spelt flour
  • 400 ml water
  • 250 g sourdough
  • 150 g rye flour
  • 150 g einkorn wheat flour
  • 120 g walnuts, halved
  • 25 g yeast
  • 15 g salt

Boil 150 milliltres of water. Sieve rye flour into a large bowl, pour in boiling water and leave for an hour to thicken into a paste.

In a small bowl dissolve yeast in 250 millilitres of water.

Add the einkorn and spelt flours, sourdough and salt to the large bowl with the rye paste. Form into a dough, knead for 10 minutes. Leave to rise for an hour, degas, leave for a further hour.

Cut into two equal pieces, add the walnuts, shape into rounds and place on greaseproof paper on a baking tray. Leave to rise covered for an hour.

Desired dough temperature 26°C.

Preheat oven to 240°C.

Place a tray half filled with boiling water in the bottom of the oven.

Turn heat down to 180°C and bake for 45 minutes.


Legendary Dishes | Räimepihvid (pan-fried herrings)

ESTONIA FINLAND 

The home cooks of the Baltic countries have kept alive the tradition of treating fresh herring like a long-lost favourite cousin, who must be fussed over.

Herring fillets by their nature attract a crust.

On the northern shore of the Baltic sea the fillets are dusted with flour, dipped in egg, coated in cheese and flour, then fried over a high heat.

Across the sea in Estonia they do exactly the same but rye flour is preferred to wheat flour and a thin mustard, loosened with oil, replaces the egg batter.

What they agree on is the cheese, grated parmigiano or a similar hard cheese.

The accompaning dishes also reflect their culinary perferences.

In Finland it might be pasta, in Estonia, it might be potatoes. Sauces vary dramatically.

In Sweden they take the fried Baltic herring onto a different level, treating it, like the Danes, with the reverence it deserves, serving it with a full orchestra of culinary sounds.

This is pan-fried herring.

  • 500 g herring fillets, deboned
  • 200 g rye flour / whole wheat flour
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 100 g cheese, grated
  • 50 g butter / 30 ml olive oil (or combination of both), for frying
  • 30 g mustard thinned with oil
  • Black Pepper, large pinch
  • Salt, large pinch
  • Dill for garnish

Place half the flour on a plate, the other half with the cheese (with seasonings) on a second plate, and the batter in a wide bowl.

Dredge fillets in flour, batter with egg or mustard, finish in the cheese-flour mix.

Fry, skin-side down first, for two minutes over a high heat for two minutes. Turn without breaking the fillets, three minutes.

Generally the herring recipes of the upper Baltic region are variations of the same theme – baked in pastry served with a napkin, deep-fried served with chips, marinated served with toast, pickled served with imagination, smoked served with salad, spiced served with fresh bread, stewed served with potatoes.


INDIGENOUS INGREDIENTS =  Baltic Herring  | Rye Flour

LEGENDARY DISHES


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Legendary Dishes | Räime Pirukad (herring pies)

ESTONIA

Encasing fish in pastry is an old tradition of the Baltic region.

Dough

  • 150 g potato, boiled in skin, grated
  • 125 g rye flour
  • 100 g butter
  • 75 g white wheat baking flour
  • 1 egg
  • 1 egg yolk
  • Black pepper, large pinch
  • Salt, large pinch

Rub butter into the flours with the seasonings, add eggs, then the potatoes. Work into a loose dough, refrigerate for an hour.

Filling

  • 500 g (4) smoked herring fillets, finely chopped 
  • 200 g cream cheese
  • 200 g sour cream
  • 150 g leek, finely chopped
  • 50 g butter
  • 2 egg whites, beaten stiff
  • 15 ml olive oil
  • Black pepper, pinch
  • Salt, pinch

Garnish

  • Chives, chopped
  • Dill, chopped

Sauté leeks in the butter and oil in a frying over a low heat for 15 minutes, until the leeks are soft. Leave to cool. Roll the dough out on a clean, floured surface to a thickness of 5 mm, cut into desired shapes to fit into pie moulds. Place dough in moulds leaving a little overlap. Preheat oven to 200°C. Mix the cream and cheese, add the leaks and seasonings. Stir in the fish, then fold in the egg white. Fill pies, bake for 30 minutes, until the filling has risen and has a golden brown colour.


INDIGENOUS INGREDIENTS =  Baltic Smoked Herring  | Potatoes | Rye Flour | Sour Cream

LEGENDARY DISHES


FRESH FRICOT | THE FRONT PAGE


EDITORIALS     EURO SNACKS     FOOD CONNECTIONS     FOOD STORIES     GLOSSARY     HIGH FIVES     LEGENDARY DISHES     
RECIPES     REVIEWS     STREET MARKETS