Tag: Pies of Europe

Legendary Dishes | Plăcintă cu Cartofi / Плацинды с картошкой / Platsindy s Kartoshkoy (potato pies)

MOLDOVA ROMANIA RUSSIA UKRAINE

Potato pies for baking


We made two versions, one with a basic dough for frying and one with a kefir dough for baking.

Basic Dough

  • 500 g white wheat flour
  • 300 g water
  • 30 ml sunflower oil
  • 5 g salt

Sift flour into a large bowl, add salt. Work the oil and water into the flour to form a loose dough. Cover, rest for 2 hours.

Kefir Dough

  • 500 g white wheat flour
  • 220 ml kefir
  • 1 egg
  • 30 ml sunflower oil
  • 10 g salt

Sift flour into a large bowl, add salt and mix. Add egg, kefir and oil, knead for 5 minutes into a smooth dough. Cover, rest for 2 hours.

Filling

  • 1 kg potatoes, cooked, mashed
  • 600 g spring onions, chopped small
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 60 ml vegetable oil (for frying)
  • 15 ml vegetable oil
  • 2 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp sugar

Over a gentle heat covered fry the spring onions until they are soft. Leave to cool.

Season the mashed potatoes, add a tablespoon of lemon juice and a little sugar. Fold in the spring onions.

Divide the dough into 25 gram pieces, shape into balls and, using a flour-dusted surface, roll out with the edges thinner than the centre. Place 50 grams of filling in the middle, flatten the filling, then take each edge of the dough and bring into the middle, pinch all the edges to seal.

Baking

Gently push a fork into the top of the dough to create an air hole. Grease two baking trays, place the pies on the trays. Bake for 10 minutes in a 240ºC oven, turn and reduce heat to 220ºC, and bake for 5 minutes until the pies have a golden-brown crust.

Frying

Fry in medium-hot oil on all sides, around 3 minutes each, until golden-brown.


Legendary Dishes | Tarte au Reblochon (cheese pie)

FRANCE

Traditionally made with bacon and onion or with assorted soft vegetables like courgettes and spinach, the debate is not about the choice of filling, it is about the pastry crust, whether to pre-bake it. We went both ways and did not come to a conclusion.

We did however make both the bacon-onion and courgette-spinach versions. We suggest you do the same, that way you get to eat it twice!

This pie is suitable for the small Reblochon rounds.

Pastry 1

  • 200 g flour
  • 100 g cold butter, cut into small pieces
  • 50 ml water
  • ½ tsp salt

Pastry 2

  • 250 g white wheat flour, t450
  • 125 g butter
  • 2 small (55 g) eggs
  • 3 g salt

Make the pastry, leave to rest in refrigerator for at least an hour.

Filling – Bacon and Onion

  • 230 g Petit Reblochon
  • 200 ml crème fraîche
  • 3 eggs
  • 125 g onion, chopped small
  • 100 g bacon, diced
  • 20 g butter
  • 5 g nutmeg, grated

Butter a pie pan (somewhere around a 24 centimetre diameter).

Roll the dough to the desired shape and place in the pan. Using a fork puncture the pastry in several places.

Or, cover with a sheet of parchment paper, place cooking weights or beans on top and bake for 15 minutes at 180ºC.

Remove and leave to cool.

Brown the bacon in a frying pan, add the onion, sauté for 15 minutes, leave to cool.

Preheat oven to 200ºC.

Beat the eggs with the cream.

Spread the bacon and onions across the pastry base. Pour in cream and egg mixture, dust with nutmeg. Cut the Reblochon into wedges and arrange them a circle on top of the cream and egg mixture.

Bake for 30 minutes at 180°C.

Filling – Courgette and Spinach

  • 230 g Petit Reblochon
  • 220 ml crème fraîche
  • 3 eggs
  • 300 g courgettes, grated
  • 250 g spinach, blanched for 5 minutes, squeezed dry, chopped
  • 125 g shallots, sliced thin
  • 15 ml olive oil
  • 5 g black pepper
  • Salt, large pinch.

Butter a pie pan (somewhere around a 24 centimetre diameter).

Roll the dough to the desired shape and place in the pan. Using a fork puncture the pastry in several places. Or, cover the pastry with a sheet of parchment paper, place cooking weights or beans on top and bake for 15 minutes at 180ºC. Remove and leave to cool.

The first method will produce a soft crust, the second method will produce a crisp crust.

Sauté the shallots in oil until they have coloured at the edges. Increase the heat to high, add the courgettes and fry, stirring constantly, for 3 minutes.

Remove from heat, leave to cool.

Prepare the spinach.

When the courgette mixture is cold, fold the spinach into it.

Preheat oven to 200ºC.

Beat the eggs with the cream.

Spread the courgette-spinach mixture across the pastry base.

Pour in cream-egg mixture, sprinkle with black pepper and a little salt.

Cut the Reblochon into wedges and arrange them a circle on top of the cream-egg mixture.

Bake for 40 minutes at 180°C.


Legendary Dishes | Game Pie

EUROPE

A puff pastry lid is adequate if the emphasis is on the contents, and it is easier but the traditional dish calls for thick hot water pastry.

Nowadays days the kind of pastry once used for raised pies is no longer acceptable, so the choice of dough is entirely personal.

This is the traditional hot water pastry recipe, the icing sugar a modern touch.

Game pies were always about the fruits, game, herbs, spices and vegetables of the field and forest, and this combination is still favoured across nothern Europe.

Dough

  • 450 g strong white wheat flour
  • 150 ml water
  • 125 g lard
  • 15 g pepper
  • 10 g salt
  • 1 tsp icing sugar

Meat Choices

  • Hare – breast meat
  • Partridge – breast meat
  • Pheasant – breast meat
  • Pigeon – breast meat
  • Rabbit – breast meat
  • Venison – loin meat

Filling

  • 1.25 kg meat, chopped small
  • 300 g forest mushrooms, chopped
  • 150 g bacon, chopped
  • 150 g chicken liver, chopped
  • 150 g onions, chopped small
  • 100 g chestnuts, chopped
  • 50 g apricots, chopped
  • 30 g sage, chopped
  • 15 g juniper berries, crushed
  • 5 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 tsp rosemary / tarragon, chopped
  • Allspice, ground, large pinch
  • Sunflower oil, for frying

Jelly

Marinade

  • 150 ml red wine / stout
  • 30 g pomegranate seeds, ground
  • 15 g paprika, smoked
  • 15 ml soy sauce
  • 10 thyme sprigs

Marinate the meat overnight, drain any excess liquid.

Sauté garlic and onions in oil over a low heat in a large frying pan, add mushrooms and when they begin to wilt add the bacon and liver, cover and simmer for ten minutes, leave to cool.

Work the meat and mushroom mixture with the herbs and spices in a large bowl into a homogenous mass, add apricots and chestnuts, and any wild berries to hand. Set aside.

Bring the lard and water to the boil.

Sieve flour and salt into a large bowl, add pepper and sugar.

Pour the hot liquid into a well in the centre of the flour, and using a sturdy wooden spoon quickly form into a soft dough.

Push the dough into the bottom and sides of a large pie tin, cutting off the excess dough to use for the lid.

Preheat oven to 220°C.

Pack the tin with the filling, roll the remaining dough out, place over the filling, crimping the edges.

Left over pieces of dough should be shaped into decorations for the lid.

Pierce a hole in the centre of the lid.

Reduce oven temperature to 180°C, bake for 90 minutes.

If a golden colour is desired, remove pie from oven, brush lid with a beaten egg, then bake for 30 minutes at 160°C.

Heat the jelly stock, pour slowly into the hole in the centre of the pie lid, leave to cool.


Legendary Dishes | Tourte a l’Abondance (Abondance pie)

FRANCE

The quantities are determined by the size of your baking tins, but the ratio of potatoes to cheese should be no less than 4:1.

Bacon can replace the pork belly, and ricotta can replace the cream and milk.

This quantity is for two round tins each with a diameter of 20 centimetres and a depth just below 4 centimetres.

Dough

  • 250 g white wheat flour, t55
  • 125 g butter
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tbsp water
  • Salt, pinch

Work butter into the flour, add egg and sufficient water to produce a loose dough.

Refrigerate for an hour or two.

Filling

  • 750 kg potatoes, peeled, sliced thin, blanched in boiling water for ten minutes, drained
  • 300 g Abondance cheese, sliced thin
  • 4 eggs
  • 200 g smoked pork belly, cubed small
  • 100 ml cream / ricotta
  • 100 ml milk / ricotta
  • 10 g black peppercorns, coarse ground
  • 5 g salt
  • Nutmeg, 8 gratings

Preheat oven to 210ºC.

Divide the pastry into two pieces, push each piece into the bottom and up the sides of the cake tins.

Arrange the cheese slices and pork belly cubes on top of the pastry.

Add a layer of potatoes.

Follow with another layer of cheese and pork belly.

Finish with a layer of potatoes and a few pieces of cheese.

Crack eggs into a bowl, add milk and cream, whisk with six gratings of nutmeg and salt.

Pour over the layers, to cover them completely. Dress with black pepper and one grating each of nutmeg.

Bake for 50 minutes.


Indigenous Ingredients

Abondance Cheese
Cream
Milk
Smoked Pork Belly
Wheat Flour

Legendary Dishes | Pâté Gaumais (pork pie)

BELGIUM

Virton butchers Leroux-Subitte are credited with the invention of this aromatic pork pie toward the end of the 1800s, a tradition that has continued with the butchers of the region.

The pastry, which is often sweetened, is prepared with a yeast dough. Generally the pastry is the domain of bakers and the filling and marinade the speciality of butchers, although some butchers prepare their own pastry.

Recipes for home-made pies are a closely-guarded secret and coveted by family and friends.

The filling is traditionally associated with loin meat with some rib and belly meat. It is cut into pieces no larger than two centimetre cubes, then marinated for at least 48 hours.

The marinade will include red or white wine and vinegar flavoured with carrots, garlic, onions or shallots and various herbs and spices from bay, black pepper, clove, juniper, parsley, sage and thyme plus salt.

Pâté Gaumais is eaten hot, usually an hour after baking, or cold and can be re-heated.

It is celebrated every December 26 in Virton with the King of Pâté Gaumais competition for the highest amount consumed in one sitting.

Marinade

  • 1 kg pork loin and rib meat, cut into 2 cm pieces
  • 500 g shallots, sliced thin
  • 125 g dry white wine / red wine
  • 4 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 5 tsp wine vinegar
  • 15 g black pepper
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1 tbsp thyme
  • 10 g salt
  • 10 juniper berries
  • 5 sprigs parsley, chopped small
  • 1 sprig sage
  • 5 rosemary spears, chopped small
  • 3 bay leaves

Marinate meat for 48 hours over two nights. Turn the meat from time to time.

Dough

  • 500 g white wheat flour, t45
  • 150 g butter, cut into small pieces
  • 2 small (55 g) eggs + 1 egg yolk
  • 100 ml milk, warmed to 38ºC
  • 50 g yeast
  • 15 g lard
  • 15 g sugar (optional)
  • 5 g salt

Dissolve the yeast in the warm milk. Add yeast mixture and eggs to the flour to make a loose dough. Work the butter into the dough in stages, finish with the lard, knead into a smooth dough, about 20 minutes. Leave to rest for two hours.

Finish

  • 1 egg, beaten

Remove bay leaves, juniper berries, sage and thyme from the marinade. Drain the liquid, leave to rest for 30 minutes, use paper towels to absorb any moisture on the meat.

Divide the dough into four pieces, cover and set aside. Take one piece and divide into two, shape into balls, one larger than the other, then into rounds.

Place a quarter of the meat mixture on the larger round, place the small round on top.

Fold the edge of the larger round into the edge of the smaller round in the crimp style.

Put the pie on a greased tray, make a small hole in the centre of the surface.

Repeat with remaining dough and meat mixture. Preheat oven to 180ºC.

Brush the egg yolk over the surface of each pie.

Bake for 60 minutes until the pies are golden brown on top.


Pâté Gaumais is produced and sold at these outlets.

BAILLOT Brothers Rue Dr. Hustin, 55 at 6760 Ethe 063/577 246
BIT Xavier Grand Rue, 43 to 6760 Virton 063/577 224
BLAISE Cured meats Place Albert 1er, 4 at 6820 Florenville 061/311 951
DE MATOS Adolfo - EUROVIANDE Place G. Lorand, 3 at 6760 Virton 063/578 870
DROPSY Roland Ruelle Giffe, 2 at 6747 Saint-Léger 063/457 300
FELSCH Didier Rue du Vieux Sart, 2 at 6769 Meix-devant-Virton 063/577 421
HOLTZHEIMER Jean Industry Street, 2 at 6792 Halanzy 063/678 579
LEFEBVRE Yvon Rue René Nicolas, 3 at 6750 Musson 063/675 747
MARECHAL Adelin Grand Rue, 88 to 6769 Gérouville 063/577 538
PEIGNOIS Claude - The heart of the Gaume Rue Dr. Hustin, 51 at 6760 Ethe 063/581 804
ROMAIN Jean-Claude Station Street, 7 at 6820 Florenville 061/311 112
THIERY Frédéric Rue du Moulin, 5 to 6750 Mussy-La-Ville 063/677 738
THOMAS Andre Rue de Neufchâteau, 2 at 6720 Habay-La-Neuve 063/422 139
TOCK Jules Grand Rue, 218 to 6740 Sainte-Marie 063/455 396

Indigenous Ingredients

Butter
Eggs
Pork
Shallots
Wine

Legendary Dishes | Home-Made Meat and Potato Pie

ENGLAND
Meat and Potato Pie with Peppered Crust

Meat and potato pies are a traditional dish of northern England, especially the counties of Cheshire, Lancashire and Yorkshire, where meat and potatoes have always formed the basis for a hearty meal. Packed in a pastry the meal becomes portable.

These pies have never been a home-baked product, largely because they have always been ubiquitous in the cafe and chip shop culture of north-west England, Holland’s version being the most popular of the mass-produced brands.

Made with beef, potato and yeast extract in a shortcrust pastry, Holland’s meat and potato pies are also synonymous with sporting events.

Meat and potato pies, as they are known today, began as a workhouse product, are probably related to Irish mutton pies, and were hardly known as a recipe in cookbooks.

Charles Elme Francatelli in his A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes, published in 1852, described a meat pie and a potato pie.

Meat Pie

Of whatever kind, let the pieces of meat be first fried brown over a quick fire, in a little fat or butter, and seasoned with pepper and salt; put these into a pie-dish with chopped onions, a few slices of half-cooked potatoes, and enough water just to cover the meat. Cover the dish with a crust, made with two pounds of flour and six ounces of butter, or lard, or fat dripping, and just enough water to knead it into a stiff kind of dough or paste, and then bake it for about an hour and a-half.

Potato Pie

Slice up four onions and boil them in a saucepan with two ounces of butter, a quart of water, and pepper and salt, for five minutes; then add four pounds of potatoes, peeled and cut in slices; stew the whole until the potatoes are done, and pour them into a pie-dish; cover this with stiff mashed potatoes, and bake the pie of a light brown colour.

Our version has an Irish stew filling and a peppered crust.


Meat and Potato Pie with Peppered Hot Pastry Crust

Filling

  • 1 kg potatoes, peeled, quartered
  • 750 g lamb, cut into 2 cubes
  • 750 g onions, chopped
  • 30 g black pepper, freshly ground
  • 25 g salt
  • Water

This is essentially an Irish stew recipe. The quantity is much more than you will need for the filling. Arrange lamb in the bottom of a large pot, turn heat to medium and allow fat to run out of the bones. Stack potatoes on top of the lamb, then the onions and seasoning, more pepper than salt. Fill the pot with water, three-quarters up to the level of the onions, bring to the boil. Cover, turn heat to lowest setting and cook for three hours.

The result should be a thick meat and potato stew, with the onions completely melted.

Dough

  • 450 g strong white wheat flour
  • 150 ml water
  • 125 g lard
  • 10 g black pepper
  • 10 g salt
  • 5 g icing sugar

Bring the lard and water to the boil.

Sieve flour and salt into a large bowl, add pepper and sugar.

Pour the hot liquid into a well in the centre of the flour, and using a sturdy wooden spoon quickly form into a soft dough.

Divide dough into eight equal pieces (approximately 90 g each), cut again – two thirds for the base, one third for the lid.

Push the dough into the bottom and sides of small deep pie tins, diameter 8 cms.

Preheat oven to 220°C.

Pack the tins with the filling, roll the remaining dough out, place over the top of the filling, crimping the edges. Pierce a hole in the centre of the lid.

Reduce oven temperature to 180°C, bake for 90 minutes.


European Culinary Connections | Potato Pies

Potatoes epitomise the rural relationship with food throughout northern and central Europe, but rarely are they combined with anything more than cheese, eggs, fish, meat and milk, especially in pies, which tend to be a marriage with meat and their juices or with the mountain cheese. So why wouldn’t you make a potato pie with the fruits of the forest or the fruits of the orchard?

In Terchová in Slovakia the potato pie is a cake that combines the savoury with the sweet, with berries and nuts. In the Wallis in Switzerland the potato pie contains apples and pears as well as cheese. In Lancashire in England the potato pie is a variation of the traditional Irish mutton stew encased in pastry.


Terchovej Zemiakový Koláč
SLOVAKIA
potato cake of Terchová

The Terchová region in Slovakia is reknown for its local produce. This potato cake makes use of indigenous ingredients, and the choice is personal. We have adapted a recipe from the 2003 book of old recipes by Cabadaj and Cross.

  • 550 g flour 
  • 400 g potatoes, boiled in skins
  • 250 g blueberry / raspberry jam
  • 150 g sugar
  • 100 g almonds / walnuts, ground
  • 100 g pork fat / sunflower oil
  • 1 egg
  • 30 g vanilla sugar
  • 15 g yeast
  • Salt, large pinch
  • Butter, for greasing
  • Sugar, for finish
  • Water, for finish

Rub the potato and fat or oil into the flour.

Beat the yeast into the egg, leave for 15 minutes, add to the mixture followed by the sugar and salt.

Knead the dough, leave for an hour, degas, divide into two equal pieces.

On a floured board roll each piece out to the size of a large round baking tin.

Grease tin, place first piece of dough in the bottom, even out, and spread with jam.

Sprinkle choice of ground nuts and vanilla sugar on top of jam, cover with the second piece of dough. Pierce surface of cake.

Bake in a 180ºC oven for 45 minutes, until the cake is brown.

Finish with water and a sprinkling of sugar. Leave to cool.


Zemiakový Koláč
SLOVAKIA
potato pie

This traditional cheese and potato pie has gone through so many variations it now resembles the quiche of eastern France and western Germany or the börek of the Balkans, made with the relevant cheeses. Traditionally this pie was filled with bryndza, the mountain cheese, encased in a milkly yeast dough. For a softer filling cream was used instead of butter.

Dough

  • 550 g white wheat flour
  • 300 ml milk, warmed
  • 45 g pork fat
  • 20 g yeast
  • 5 g salt
  • 5 g sugar
  • Pork fat / lard, for dressing

Filling

  • 600 g potatoes, cooked, skinned, mashed
  • 400 g bryndza, crumbled
  • 30-60 g sour cream / 45 g butter
  • Black pepper, large pinch
  • Salt, pinch

Dissolve yeast in the warm milk and a teaspoon of sugar, whisk.

Add salt to the flour and rub in the pork fat (or lard). Pour in the milk and yeast mixture.

Knead into a smooth dough, leave to rise for an hour.

Combine the cheese and potatoes with the cream or butter and seasonings.

Divide dough into two equal pieces, roll out on a floured surface into thin sheet to fit choice of baking tray.

Grease tray, fold in the first sheet, cover with filling, top with remaining dough sheet.

Melt a tablespoon of fat or lard and brush surface of dough. Pierce surface with fork.

Bake at 180°C for 45 minutes.


Cholera
SWITZERLAND
apple, cheese, pear, potato pie

The 1830s were difficult for the people of the hidden Swiss valleys. Cholera swept across the land, confining people to their homes, where they relied on the stable foods of the land. Out of adversity a traditional dish emerged and survives today.

The traditional Gommer Cholera contained equal amounts of apple, cabbage and potato, half the amount of cheese, and was baked using a plain pastry dough.

  • 500 g puff pastry
  • 400 g potatoes, boiled whole, peeled, sliced 
  • 400 g raclette cheese, sliced
  • 250 g Gala apples, sliced
  • 250 g Bosc pears, sliced
  • 150 g leeks, halved, sliced, braised in butter 
  • Egg for glaze
  • Seasonings
  • Nutmeg, 5 gratings

Preheat oven to 215°C.

Cover the base and sides of a cake tin with pastry.

Prick the base lightly with a fork. Layer evenly with apple followed by the potato, leeks and onions.

Season with salt, pepper and nutmeg.

Lay cheese on top, then a pastry lid, press edges of pastry together, prick lightly with a fork in several places.

Brush with egg and bake for an hour.


Meat and Potato Pie with Peppered Hot Pastry Crust
ENGLAND

Meat and potato pies are a traditional dish of northern England, especially the counties of Cheshire, Lancashire and Yorkshire, where the combination has always formed the basis for a hearty meal. Packed in a pastry it becomes portable.

These pies have never been a home-baked product, largely because they have always been ubiquitous in the cafe and chip shop culture of north-west England, Holland’s version being the most popular of the mass-produced brands.

Made with beef, potato and yeast extract in a shortcrust pastry, Holland’s meat and potato pies are also synonymous with sporting events.

Meat and potato pies, as they are known today, began as a workhouse product, are probably related to Irish mutton pies, and were hardly known as a recipe in cookbooks.

Filling

  • 1 kg potatoes, peeled, quartered
  • 750 g lamb, cut into 2 cubes
  • 750 g onions, chopped
  • 30 g black pepper, freshly ground
  • 25 g salt Water

This is essentially an Irish stew recipe. The quantity is much more than you will need for the filling.

Arrange lamb in the bottom of a large pot, turn heat to medium and allow fat to run out of the bones.

Stack potatoes on top of the lamb, then the onions and seasoning, more pepper than salt.

Fill the pot with water, three-quarters up to the level of the onions, bring to the boil.

Cover, turn heat to lowest setting and cook for three hours.

The result should be a thick meat and potato stew, with the onions completely melted.

Dough

  • 450 g strong white flour
  • 150 ml water
  • 125 g lard
  • 10 g pepper
  • 10 g salt
  • 5 g icing sugar

Bring the lard and water to the boil.

Sieve flour and salt into a large bowl, add pepper and sugar.

Pour the hot liquid into a well in the centre of the flour, and using a sturdy wooden spoon quickly form into a soft dough.

Divide dough into eight equal pieces (approximately 90 g each), cut again – two thirds for the base, one third for the lid.

Push the dough into the bottom and sides of small deep pie tins, diameter 8 cms.

Preheat oven to 220°C.

Pack the tins with the filling, roll the remaining dough out, place over the top of the filling, crimping the edges. Pierce a hole in the centre of the lid.

Reduce oven temperature to 180°C, bake for 90 minutes.


Fish and Potato Pie
ENGLAND SCOTLAND

Always thought of as a fish pie rather than a potato pie, this traditional dish combined ingredients that have always come together. Baking the fish in a cheese sauce topped with mashed potato and grated cheese made this dish a meal instead of a snack.

  • 1 kg assorted smoked and unsmoked fish fillets, fresh or frozen, cut into bite sized pieces
  • 1 kg potatoes, cooked, riced
  • 600 ml milk
  • 200 g mature melting cheese, grated
  • 40 g butter
  • 40 g flour
  • 25 g parsley, chopped
  • 15 g black pepper, freshly ground

Make a light roux. Remove pan from heat, whisk milk a little at a time into the mixture. Back on the heat bring to the boil stirring constantly. Turn heat to low, stir in half the cheese.

Add parsley and pepper, allow to cool.

Preheat oven to 200°C.

Arrange fish in ovenproof dish, pour sauce over fish and finish with potato and remaining cheese.

Bake for 45 minutes until crisp and golden, and piping hot in the middle.


Pisía Pontiaká Πισία Ποντιακά
GREECE
potato pies

Traditionally these delightful little potato pies are served with honey and dressed with cinnamon and sugar.

Dough

  • 500 g white wheat flour
  • 125 lemon juice
  • 1 duck egg / 2 hen eggs (110 g)
  • 45 ml olive oil
  • 30 g vanilla sugar
  • 15 g yeast
  • 5 g salt

Warm lemon juice, add sugar, reduce heat and stir, leave until warm to the touch. Dissolve yeast in the juice. Stir salt into the flour. Break the egg into the flour, add the olive oil and yeast mixture. Knead into a smooth dough, leave to rise for an hour, degas.

Filling

  • 900 g potatoes, whole, boiled in their skins, mashed with a fork
  • 300 g onions, chopped small
  • 45 ml olive oil
  • 10 g dried oregano
  • 5 g salt
  • 1 tbsp fresh parsley

Sweat onions in oil over a medium-low heat for 30 minutes. Add the potatoes, parsley, salt, pepper, oregano, stir, remove from the heat, and let the filling stand for about 30 minutes to cool.

Roll the dough thin, cut into 12 cm rounds. Place the filing on top, shape into an oblong, seal and roll, pinching any open gaps.

Fry in shallow oil until they are golden on all sides.


Indigenous Ingredients

Note from Fricot Editors:

Please bear with us while we continue to prepare the indigenous ingredients database.

Potato
A Story About Potatoes

THE GREAT EUROPEAN FOOD ADVENTURE | Lausanne | Café Romand and the Farm Shop of Vaud

Cafe Romand

We have crossed the lake from Evian Les Bains to Ouchy and now we are on the metro railway up to Flon in hilly Lausanne. Our destination is Café Romand on Place Saint-François. Tucked in beside the church, this august establishment made its reputation under the auspices of Madame Christiane Péclat and chef cuisinier Thierry Lagegre.

It is rustic charm and if you are lucky you’ll get a two-person table by the wide window looking out at those looking in, wondering what you are going to eat. For us today it will be rösti, pan-fried potatoes, one of Madame Péclat’s signature dishes. Lagegre made his rösti with parboiled waxy potatoes, in the fashion of the Bernese. That story is for later in the adventure.

We have a dilemma. To explain we must tell you a story about a brotherhood, a competition and a baker-butcher tradition first established in the 1950s. In 2009 the Confrérie de la Charcuterie Artisanale (a brotherhood of over 100 artisanal butchers inaugurated a year earlier) announced their intention to organise a festival to promote their products, and one in particular, the pie known as pâté Vaudois.

For decades a collaboration between the baker who would supply the dough and the butcher who would supply the meat filling had flourished in the villages of the region. The jambon croissant, the pâté and the vol-au-vent became the standard snacks across the region. Gradually the demand increased and production intensified.

Philippe Stuby, a Vevey butcher and artisanal specialist, saw trouble ahead. The city of Lausanne agreed and organised a Pâté D’or for the following year. A competition was arranged. A baker, a butcher and a farmer sampled pies from the region, from artisanal producers and from the supermarkets Aperto, Coop, Manor and Migros.

The judges were disappointed with the quality of the pies and pulled no punches. It was a blind-tasting. Points were awarded for the quality of the crust, the meat and the jelly. Sisters Brigitte Grossenbacher and Maggy Berti of Le Petit Encas in Etagnières won with a jelly and meat filling that blew the judges away. Everyone was delighted, especially butcher Stuby. The industrial pies were seen for what they were, and the artisanal pies were revealed as products of the terrain.

The flour for the pie dough came from Echallens mills, a mixture of three wheat flours, a rye four and an oatmeal flour. Daniel Grossenbacher, Brigitte’s husband, produced the meat. ‘There is premier pork, cheek and rind. It is cooked at a low temperature, 18 hours at 72°C. The small bones and the cartilages are removed, and then chopped and kneaded and the spices incorporated. A little dough is added for homogeneity.’ After a 60-minute bake at 185ºC, then cooled, the jelly is poured through the funnel of each pie for a daily total of 1500 pâté Vaudois. Brigitte Grossenbacher is adamant. ‘We like what we do, we do simple things with top quality products, there are things to respect such as cooking times, jelly, the preparation of the meat …’

And now we want to taste these wonderful pies and see whether we can get the recipe for the jelly. We find that a trip to Etagnières will take 20 minutes on the regional train to Echallens, the site of the floor mill, and we wonder whether we can combine a visit to both. After an exchange we decide it is not practical. ‘Where can we get your pies?’ we ask in hope and explain that we are in Flon.

‘You are in luck, go to the Vaud Farm Shop on Place de la Palud.’

Just around the corner.

Farm Shop of Vaud

We are in the heart of Lausanne old town, and there it is, a few steps back from the cobblestone street under an archway guarded by a large inanimate cow. La Ferme Vaudoise.

Produits de Terroir – indigenous food produce and artisanal food products of the canton. These include numerous flours, bread sticks, white cabbage sausage, dried meat and those pies.

They sit serene under the glass counter.


Legendary Dishes | Pierogi / Pīrāgi / Pirogi Пироги (bread-cake dough pies)

POLAND RUSSIA UKRAINE

Pies filled closed or open with a combination from apple, cabbage, cheese, egg, mushroom, onion, potato, pumpkin and rice to accompany fish or meat with various aromatics and jams are an integral feature of the traditional food of northern Europe, from the Baltic states across to the Russian heartlands and down to the Ukrainian steppes.

What makes these particular pies unique in traditional cuisine are the various types of dough, which are a cross between a cake dough and a yeast dough with a liquid medium that could be kefir or milk, fat content that could be butter or margarine and sour cream and include potato among the various types of flour.

The sour-sweet combination that is apple, cabbage and onion is the traditional base and after that there are countless variations on numerous themes that include chicken, fish and various meats.

The pies come in all shapes and sizes.

Dough

  • 500 g white wheat flour, t550
  • 200 ml milk, warmed to 38ºC
  • 1 small egg
  • 60 g sugar
  • 50 g sour cream
  • 25 g butter / margarine, melted
  • 25 g yeast
  • 1 tbsp sunflower oil
  • 5 g salt
  • 1 egg, beaten, for glazing

Dissolve the yeast in 5 tablespoons of the warm milk and one teaspoon of sugar, leave to froth for 15 minutes.

In a bowl whisk the sour cream into the remaining milk and sugar. Add the yeast mixture followed by the melted butter or margarine, and finally the egg and salt with a few swift turns of the whisk each time. Sieve the flour into this mixture, fold out onto a clean work surface and begin to knead.

This is a sticky dough so after 5 minutes add a drop of oil, around a teaspoon, knead for a further 5 minutes, add more oil, knead again for 5 minutes, add oil and knead until the dough is elastic, adding more oil if necessary.

The desired dough temperature is 24ºC.

Leave to rise for two hours, degas, leave to rise again, for another two hours.

Filling

  • 1 green cabbage / kale, leaves separated, stems removed, blanched in hot water for 30 minutes, sliced into strips
  • 1 kg beef mince
  • 1 kg onions, sliced
  • 1 kg sour apples, peeled, cored, puréed with 30 g sugar
  • 5 g black pepper
  • 5 g salt
  • 1 tsp caraway seeds
  • 1 tbsp mixed dried herbs (from dill, lovage, marjoram, sage, tarragon)
  • Vegetable oil, for frying

Fry the onions in 2 tablespoons of oil over a high heat for 5 minutes, cover, reduce heat and cook for 30 minutes until the onions are soft and have taken on colour at the edges.

Divide the onion mixture into three portions.

Put the minced meat in the onion pan, add one third of the cooked onions and gently bring up the heat. When the meat begins to brown low the heat and reduce the liquid content.

Put the blanched cabbage strips in a small pot, add the second third of the cooked onions, cook over a medium heat until the cabbage is soft and the liquid is reduced, about 15 minutes.

Put the last third of the cooked onions in a pot, add 500 grams of apple purée, cook over a high heat until the liquid is reduced.

Grease 4 pie tins. Roll out the dough to a thickness of half a centimetre. Cut into two rounds with a sufficient amount of dough to come up the sides, press into the tins. Leave to rise for 30 minutes.

Roll out the remaining dough and cut into rounds slightly larger than the diametre of the pie tins.

Preheat oven to 180ºC.

Spoon the meat-onion mixture onto the bottom of each pie dough, cover with the cabbage-onion mixture followed by the apple-onion mixture. Top with remaining apple purée.

Place the dough rounds on top. Seal the edges of each dough, impress edges with a fork. Pierce the top of each pie with the fork. Glaze the tops with an egg wash.

Bake for 35 minutes.

Legendary Dishes | Piperópita Pilíou Πιπερόπιτα Πηλίου (Pelion pepper pie)

GREECE
  • 800 g horned red peppers, sliced
  • 250 g filo pastry
  • 200 g feta, crushed
  • 2 red peppers, chopped
  • 2 orange peppers, chopped
  • 2 large tomatoes, skinned, chopped, liquid drained
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 60 ml milk
  • 60 g trahana powder
  • 45 ml olive oil
  • 15 g butter
  • 5 g black pepper
  • 5 g salt

Sauté the onions and sliced horned peppers in the oil, covered, until they begin to wilt. Add the bell peppers, cover and cook over a medium-high heat for 5 minutes. Remove cover, increase heat, cook until all the liquid has evaporated, stirring several times. Take off heat, leave to cool. Stir in the feta, tomato pulp, trahana and seasonings.

Preheat oven to 180ºC.

Beat 2 egg whites in a bowl, fold into the cheese-onion-pepper-tomato mixture.

Butter a baking tray. Crumble the filo, place half on the buttered surface of the tray, add the cheese mixture, top with remaining filo. Beat the egg yolks with the milk, coat the filo.

Bake for 50 minutes.

Legendary Dishes | Kerkyraïkí Giaourtópita Κερκυραϊκή Γιαουρτόπιτα (lemon yoghurt pie)

GREECE
  • 5 eggs, separated
  • 300 g white wheat flour, t500 / white spelt flour
  • 250 g sugar
  • 250 g yoghurt
  • 220 g butter, softened
  • 5 lemons, zest
  • 1 lemon, juice
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 vanilla pod

Whisk butter and sugar until it is integrated, add egg yolks and yogurt, beat mixture until smooth.

In a separare bowl beat egg whites until they are stiff.

Combine flour, baking powder, soda, lemon zest and vanilla.

Fold one spoonful of the flour mixture followed by one spoonful of egg whites into the butter-sugar mixture. Repeat until the flour mixture and egg whites are used up.

Add the lemon juice and pour the batter into a prepared cake tin or tray.

Bake at 180ºC for 70 minutes.

Legendary Dishes | Pisía Pontiaká Πισία Ποντιακά (potato pies)

GREECE

Traditionally these delightful little potato pies are served with honey and dressed with cinnamon and sugar.

Dough

  • 500 g white wheat flour
  • 125 lemon juice
  • 1 duck egg / 2 hen eggs (110 g)
  • 45 ml olive oil
  • 30 g vanilla sugar
  • 15 g yeast
  • 5 g salt

Warm lemon juice, add sugar, reduce heat and stir, leave until warm to the touch. Dissolve yeast in the juice. Stir salt into the flour. Break the egg into the flour, add the olive oil and yeast mixture. Knead into a smooth dough, leave to rise for an hour, degas.

Filling

  • 900 g potatoes, whole, boiled in their skins, mashed with a fork
  • 300 g onions, chopped small
  • 45 ml olive oil
  • 10 g dried oregano
  • 5 g salt
  • 1 tbsp fresh parsley

Sweat onions in oil over a medium-low heat for 30 minutes. Add the potatoes, parsley, salt, pepper, oregano, stir, remove from the heat, and let the filling stand for about 30 minutes to cool.

Roll the dough thin, cut into 12 cm rounds. Place the filing on top, shape into an oblong, seal and roll, pinching any open gaps.

Fry in shallow oil until they are golden on all sides.


Legendary Dishes | Bougátsa Μπουγάτσα (cheese custard pie)

GREECE

The double act that is filo and feta among the traditional pie dishes of Greece has a tendancy to over-shadow the food acts that require kefalotyri, the spicy hard cheese made from goat or sheep milk, and ladotiri, the salty hard cheese also made from goat or sheep milk.

Bougátsa is one of these acts. Generally a custard pie made with semolina it is often transformed into a cheese custard pie made with kefalotyri and ladotyri to produce an enigmatic flavour that is unforgettable.

Pastry

  • 12 leaves of filo pastry
  • 120 g butter, melted
  • Butter, for greasing

Cheese Sauce

  • 1 litre milk
  • 250 g kefalotyri cheese
  • 250 g ladotyri mytilinis cheese
  • 80 g butter
  • 80 g white flour
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 5 g black pepper
  • Nutmeg, 20 gratings
  • Salt, pinch

Heat milk and butter in separate saucepans. Add flour to the butter saucepan to make a roux. Increase heat. Using a wire whisk stir the warm milk into the roux. Add black pepper and nutmeg. Cook until the mixture begins to thicken. Remove from heat, leave to cool. Stir the cheeses and the egg yolk into the sauce and add some salt.

In turn smear the melted butter over half of the pastry leaves, crumple and place in the bottom of a buttered baking tray.

Pour the cheese sauce on top.

Smear all but two of the remaining pastry leaves with butter, crumple on top of the cheese sauce. Smear the last two pastry leaves with butter, place on top of the crumpled leaves.

Bake at 170ºC for 45 minutes.

Legendary Dishes | Kurnik s Kuritsey i Kartoshkoy {Курник с курицей и картошкой} (chicken and potato pie)

RUSSIA

Dough

  • 750 g white spelt flour
  • 400 ml kefir, brought up to room temperature
  • 250 g white wheat flour
  • 100 g butter
  • 100 ml milk, warmed
  • 1 egg
  • 30 g sugar (optional)
  • 25 g yeast
  • 15 g salt

Dissolve the yeast in the milk and, if using, sugar. Sieve the flours into a large bowl, add the salt, work the butter into the flour, add the yeast mixture, egg and knead into a smooth dough. The desired dough temperature is 25ºC. Leave to rise for two hours, degas, leave for another two hours, degas.

Filling

  • 900 g potatoes, whole, peeled, sliced thin
  • 600 g chicken breast and thigh meat, chopped small
  • 500 g onions / shallots, sliced
  • 30 g butter
  • 30 ml vegetable oil
  • 1 tbsp light (Kikkoman) soy sauce
  • 5 g black pepper
  • 5 g salt

Finish

1 egg yolk
1 tbsp water

Sweat onions or shallots in two tablespoons of oil over a low heat for 30 minutes until they are soft and translucent. Add chicken, increase heat and cook until it turns white. Season. Fold the potatoes into the mixture, cover and cook over a low heat for 5 minutes. Leave to cool naturally. Stir soy sauce into the mixture.

Preheat oven to 200ºC. Cut the dough into 200 gram balls, roll each ball flat, place filling in the middle, bring edges together, fold each side into the middle and pinch edges. Place together on a greased tray. Leave to rise for 30 minutes. Bake for 35 minutes.

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