Tag: Netherlands

Legendary Dishes | Stoemp (aromatic carrot, onion, potato mash)

BELGIUM FRANCE GERMAN LUXEMBOURG NETHERLANDS

A Flemish dish associated with Brussels, stoemp is popular in Belgium, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, northern France and western Germany.

  • 750 g carrots, peeled, cubed
  • 750 g floury potatoes, peeled, cubed
  • 300 g onions, chopped small
  • 5 g nutmeg, grated
  • Black pepper, freshly ground, large pinch
  • Salt, large pinch
  • Butter, for mash (optional)
  • Milk, for mash (optional)
  • Water, for boiling

Boil carrots, onions and potatoes with a pinch of salt in sufficient water to cover in a large pot, drain, mash, season and, if necessary, add a small amount of butter and milk. Serve with choice of meat and vegetables.


INDIGENOUS INGREDIENTS =  Carrots | Nutmeg | Onions | Potatoes

LEGENDARY DISHES


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Fricot Feature | The Goulash Story in Five Recipes

BELGIUM FRANCE HUNGARY LIECHTENSTEIN LUXEMBOURG NETHERLANDS ROMANIA

1: Kalbsrahmgulasch LIECHTENSTEIN creamy veal stew

This is the meat stew most people believe is goulash. It is a dish that became popular during the Austro-Hungarian era, now a traditional dish in Austria, Germany and Liechtenstein. Beef shoulder can be used as a substitute. This is an adaptation of the recipe by chef Christian Helmreich at Restaurant Engel in Vaduz. This stew is generally served with the small dumplings known as spätzle.

  • 1 kg veal shoulder, 4 cm cubed
  • 500 ml veal stock / beer
  • 375 g onions, sliced
  • 150 ml double cream / crème fraîche
  • 150 ml white wine
  • 125 g long red peppers, sliced
  • 100 g sweet apple purée
  • 60 ml rapeseed oil
  • 30 g sweet paprika powder
  • 15 ml lemon juice
  • 15 g tomato paste
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed, mashed
  • 10 peppercorns, crushed
  • 6 juniper berries, crushed
  • 2 bay leaves
  • Salt, large pinch

Fry onions, peppers and garlic in half of the oil for five minutes over a high heat, reduce heat, cover and sweat for 30 minutes. Place onion-pepper mixture in an ovenproof pot, add paprika powder, tomato paste, apple purée, crushed spices and bay leaves. Heat gently for five minutes. Deglaze frying pan with the wine, add contents to the pot. Brown veal cubes in remaining oil, set aside with a slotted spoon, deglaze pan with some of the stock. Add the stock from the pan and remaining stock to the pot. Add the meat and bring to a low boil, add lemon juice and seasonings. Transfer to oven. Bake, uncovered in the middle of the oven, at 160ºC for 100 minutes, add cream and finish at 140ºC for 20 minutes.

2: Tokány ROMANIA paprika stew

This is the original meat and paprika stew. Vladimir Mirodan says it was brought south to Bucharest by young Transylvanian girls in search of services and fortune. The kidneys can be from calves, lambs or pigs. The marjoram, mushrooms, paprika and sour cream are essential. Without them it does not have the distinctive flavour that make it one of the region‘s most popular traditional dishes. This is an adaptation from Károly Gundel’s Hungarian Cookery Book.

  • 500 g mushrooms, sliced
  • 350 g beef, cut into strips
  • 350 g pork, cut into strips
  • 350 g pork kidney, blanched, cut into strips
  • 300 g sour cream
  • 200 ml water
  • 150 g onions, chopped small
  • 150 g smoked bacon, cubed
  • 60 g sunflower oil
  • 6 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 30 g hot paprika
  • 10 g black pepper, freshly ground
  • 1 tsp mild paprika
  • 5 g marjoram, fresh or dried
  • Salt, two large pinches

Sauté onions in oil in a large frying pan over a low heat for 20 minutes. Remove from heat, add hot paprika, allow to soak in. Put pan back on heat, add beef, garlic, marjoram and seasonings, sauté until beef is brown. Add half the water, simmer for 10 minutes until the liquid has evaporated. Add pork, brown, simmer for 10 minutes in remaining water. In a separate frying pan sauté bacon and kidneys over a medium heat. When the kidneys are cooked add mushrooms and seasonings, cook for five minutes. Pour contents of bacon pan into beef pan, simmer for ten minutes, add mild paprika, then the cream and bring to a low boil. The aroma from this stew deters night creatures, so heavy with the garlic.

3: Carbonnades Flamandes / Stoofvlees op Vlaamse Wijze BELGIUM FLANDERS FRANCE LUXEMBOURG NETHERLANDS beef and beer stew

The western goulash, a sweet slightly acidic traditional dish of the low countries centred on Flanders. Chimay and Rodenbach are the preferred traditional beers for this iconic dish. Leffe Brune is acceptable. Stale bread spread with mustard was the traditional method of thickening the liquid, now gingerbread with its subtle spice flavours is used.

  • 2 kg brisket / shoulder beef, cut into 3 cm pieces, seasoned
  • 1 litre beef stock
  • 600 g onions, sliced
  • 375 ml dark brown beer
  • 250 g fatty bacon, cubed
  • 2 slices gingerbread bread / white bread, crusts removed, spread with mustard
  • 60 g butter
  • 30 g brown sugar
  • 30 g white wheat flour
  • 30 g mustard
  • 30 ml olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 10 g salt
  • 10 black peppercorns
  • 5 g black pepper, freshly ground
  • 5 juniper berries, crushed
  • Green peppercorns, large pinch
  • 4 sprigs thyme
  • 1 sprig rosemary
  • 2 bay leaves

Brown beef in half the butter and oil in a large heavy-based pot over a medium heat in batches, remove and set aside. Add remaining butter and oil to pan, turn heat to low and sauté the bacon for five minutes, then the onions for 15 minutes. Stir the flour into the onions and brown lightly. Deglaze the pan with three tablespoons of stock, then pour in remaining stock with the beer and herbs and juniper berries. Bring slowly to the boil. Add the beef, then, if using, place the mustard bread on top, mustard side down or add the gingerbread and mustard. Add the garlic, black peppercorns and seasonings, turn heat to low to medium, and simmer for two and a half hours, stirring occasionally during second hour. Sweeten with sugar and cook for 30 minutes uncovered. Season, serve with pasta or potatoes, chipped or mashed.

4: Bogracsgulyás HUNGARY kettle stew

A traditional dish of the steppes, the essential ingredient was meat dried on the saddle. The Magyars added the meat to a large pot of water, then finished the dish with the addition of dumplings or root vegetables, heavily spiced with paprika.

  • 1.5 kg beef, 2 cm cubed
  • 1.5 kg floury potatoes, peeled, 2 cm cubed
  • 1.5 litres water
  • 500 g onions, sliced
  • 250 g fatty pork belly, cubed small
  • 30 g Szeged sweet paprika
  • 10 g Szeged hot paprika
  • Seasonings

Fry pork over low heat in a large pot until the fat begins to separate and the meat turns crispy. Remove with a slotted spoon, set aside. Fry onions in fat over a high heat, about five minutes, remove and set aside. Brown beef, return the onions to the pot with the water, bring to the boil. Add the sweet paprika, cover and simmer for an hour. Carefully slip the potatoes into the pot, bring back to the boil, reduce heat to low, season, cover, leave for 20 minutes. Sprinkle half of the hot paprika on top of the stew, leave uncovered for five minutes. Serve in deep bowls, adding a pinch of hot paprika to each dish, a chunk of bread on the side to mop up the juices.

5: Gulyásleves HUNGARY beef soup

Buda and Pest are among the few centres of civilisation in Europe where the peasant culture is still reflected in the choice of traditional foods available in restaurants. In Budapest soups start every meal, and most of the time that meal is a stew. The exception is gulyásleves, the beef soup known as goulash. It is often served as a main course accompanied with egg-flour noddles. Kéhli, one of the city’s oldest restaurants, specialises in traditional food including bean, beef, chicken and fish soups and the range of stews. Sípos Halászkert serves a diverse range of fish soups.

  • 1.5 litre of water
  • 900 g beef, cubed 2 cm
  • 500 g potatoes, diced small
  • 500 g onions, chopped
  • 300 g parsnip / turnip, diced
  • 300 g tomatoes
  • 250 g carrots, diced
  • 250 g green or red peppers
  • 100 g celery, cut small
  • 30 g lovage leaves
  • 4 garlic cloves, mashed
  • 10 g paprika, hot or sweet
  • 5 g caraway seeds
  • 2 bay leaves
  • black pepper, pinch
  • salt, pinch
  • Oil, for frying

Sauté the onions in the oil for 30 minutes, increase heat and brown the beef. Reduce heat, stir in the tomatoes and peppers, add the garlic and cover. Leave to simmer for 30 minutes. Add the bay leaves, caraway seeds and paprika. After five minutes add the vegetables, remaining seasonings and water. Cook until the potatoes are al dente.


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Legendary Dishes | Kapsalon (the hairdresser = potato fries, shoarma / shawarma meat, cheese, salad and sauce)

West Kruiskade in central Rotterdam – the street of the thousand flavours – where the kapsalon originated. Photo from Spicy by Irene de Vette
BELGIUM | NETHERLANDS

Potato fries coated with shoarma (aka shawarma) meat and melting gouda cheese, topped with salad and served with a sauce, this is the Hairdresser! The dish originated in 2003 when Nathaniel Gomes, the Cape Verdean owner of the Rotterdam hairdresser Tati, went to the shoarma shop El Aviva and asked for all this favourite ingredients in one go. It became a regular order, took its name, and is now very popular among Dutch and Belgian youths. At 1800 kcal kapsalon is a calorie bomb.

Essential Ingredients

Kapsalon is also made with chicken, döner, falafel, gyros or kebab.

  • Shoarma (chicken, beef, lamb or turkey)
  • Baked fries
  • Grated cheese
  • Iceberg lettuce, sliced
  • Red onion, sliced
  • Sauces: garlic sauce, curry sauce, peanut sauce, ketchup, mayonnaise

Shoarma (Shawarma) Spice Mixtures

The spices for shoarma (shawarma) are variations of cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, cumin, ginger, mace, nutmeg and black, cayenne and paprika pepper.

Dry Mix

  • 15 g coriander, ground
  • 15 g cumin, ground
  • 15 g garlic, powder
  • 8 g cinnamon, ground
  • 8 g paprika, ground
  • 1 tsp black pepper, ground
  • 1 tsp garam masala (optional)
  • 1 tsp ginger, ground
  • 1 tsp turmeric, ground
  • Cayenne, large pinch
  • Cloves, large pinch

Wet Mix

  • 120 ml lemon juice
  • 10 garlic cloves
  • 60 ml apple cider / grape vinegar
  • 60 ml olive oil / vegetable oil
  • 1 onion, grated
  • 1 tsp allspice
  • 1 tsp cloves
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp thyme
  • Caraway, large pinch
  • Cardamom, ground, large pinch
  • Cayenne, ground, large pinch
  • Cinnamon, ground, large pinch
  • Cumin, ground, large pinch
  • Ginger, ground, large pinch
  • Pepper, ground, large pinch

The Dutch add nutmeg to these mixes.

Shoarma (Shawarma) Beef

Derived from the Turkish verb çevirme (revolve, rotate) to describe grilling stacked meat on a spit during the Ottoman period (1518 to 1918), migrants from the Levant brought the method to the Netherlands, where it evolved separately to the tradition that remained in the eastern Mediterranean’s Arabic regions. Traditionally it was a mixture of all kinds of poor quality meat marinated in a large quantity of garlic and spices to mask the flavour, grilled, like the Turkish döner kebab, on a vertical spit (instead of the horizontal spit), an indication that it was influenced by Iskender Efendi who changed the centuries old method of grilling stacked meat in the 1860s. Essentially döner and shoarma / shawarma are the same, with different names and variations in preparation and content between Europe and the Levant.

  • 500 g beef, lean, cut into strips
  • 75 ml shoarma (shawarma) wet mix
  • 15 ml sunflower oil

Marinate meat in the wet shoarma (shawarma) mixture overnight. Brown meat in oil in a wide frying pan over a medium heat, about five minutes. Preheat oven to 180°C. Place meat in a small baking tray, spoon a tablespoon of the marinade over the top. Cover with foil, bake for 20 minutes. Remove foil, bake for ten minutes. Leave to rest for five minutes, serve.

Shoarma (Shawarma) Chicken

  • 500 g chicken, cut into strips
  • 15 ml red / white wine vinegar
  • 15 g shoarma (shawarma) dry mix
  • 15 ml sunflower oil

Marinate meat in the shoarma (shawarma) spices overnight. Brown meat in oil in a wide frying pan over a medium heat, about five minutes. Preheat oven to 180°C. Place meat in a small baking tray and spoon vinegar over the top. Cover with foil, bake for 20 minutes. Remove foil and bake for ten minutes. Leave to rest for five minutes, serve.

Shoarma (Shawarma) Lamb

  • 500 g lamb, lean, cut into strips
  • 120 ml yoghurt
  • 2 red peppers
  • 30 ml olive oil
  • 15 g shoarma (shawarma) dry mix
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed, chopped
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Marinade meat and peppers in oil and spices for an hour, separate meat. Combine garlic, yoghurt and seasonings. Brown meat in a wok over a high heat, add peppers, then the garlic yoghurt mixture. Cook for five minutes. Serve with hot pita (flatbread / pouch bread), the sauce on the side, garnished with green chillies and lemon wedges.

Text © Fricot Project 1998-2019 | Photos Irene de Vette

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Legendary Dishes | Carbonnades Flamandes / Stoofvlees op Vlaamse Wijze (beef and beer stew)

BELGIUM | FRANCE | NETHERLANDS

The western goulash, a sweet slightly acidic traditional dish of the low countries centred on Flanders. Chimay and Rodenbach are the preferred traditional beers for this iconic dish. Leffe Brune is acceptable. Stale bread spread with mustard was the traditional method of thickening the liquid, now gingerbread with its subtle spice flavours is used.

  • 2 kg brisket / shoulder beef, cut into 3 cm pieces, seasoned
  • 1 litre beef stock
  • 600 g onions, sliced
  • 375 ml dark brown beer 
  • 250 g fatty bacon, cubed
  • 2 slices gingerbread bread / white bread, crusts removed, spread with mustard
  • 60 g butter
  • 30 g brown sugar
  • 30 g white wheat flour
  • 30 g mustard
  • 30 ml olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 10 g salt
  • 10 black peppercorns
  • 5 g black pepper, freshly ground
  • 5 juniper berries, crushed
  • Green peppercorns, large pinch
  • 4 sprigs thyme
  • 1 sprig rosemary 
  • 2 bay leaves

Brown beef in half the butter and oil in a large heavy-based pot over a medium heat in batches, remove and set aside. Add remaining butter and oil to pan, turn heat to low and sauté the bacon for five minutes, then the onions for 15 minutes. Stir the flour into the onions and brown lightly. Deglaze the pan with three tablespoons of stock, then pour in remaining stock with the beer and herbs and juniper berries. Bring slowly to the boil. Add the beef, then, if using, place the mustard bread on top, mustard side down or add the gingerbread and mustard. Add the garlic, black peppercorns and seasonings, turn heat to low to medium, and simmer for two and a half hours, stirring occasionally during second hour. Sweeten with sugar and cook for 30 minutes uncovered. Season, serve with pasta or potatoes, chipped or mashed.

LEGENDARY DISHES


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Legendary Dishes | Tokány (Transylvanian paprika stew)

ROMANIA
paprikastew.jpg

Dracula is not the only legend to have emerged from the forests of Transylvania.

If other legends are to be believed, the original goulash was a meat and paprika stew of Transylvania.

Vladimir Mirodan says it was brought south to Bucharest by young Transylvanian girls ‘in search of services and fortune’.

This is an adaptation from Károly Gundel’s Hungarian Cookery Book.

The kidneys can be from calves, lambs or pigs.

The marjoram, mushrooms, paprika and sour cream are essential. Without them it does not have the distinctive flavour that make it one of the region’s most popular traditional dishes.

  • 500 g mushrooms, sliced
  • 350 g beef, cut into strips
  • 350 g pork, cut into strips
  • 350 g pork kidney, blanched, cut into strips
  • 300 g sour cream
  • 200 ml water
  • 150 g onions, chopped small
  • 150 g smoked bacon, cubed
  • 60 g sunflower oil
  • 6 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 30 g hot paprika
  • 1 tsp mild paprika
  • 10 g black pepper, freshly ground
  • 5 g marjoram
  • Salt, two large pinches

Sauté onions in oil in a large frying pan over a low heat for 20 minutes.

Remove from heat, add hot paprika, allow to soak in.

Put pan back on heat, add beef, garlic, majoram and seasonings, sauté until beef is brown.

Add half the water, simmer for 10 minutes until the liquid has evaporated.

Add pork, brown, simmer for 10 minutes in remaining water.

In a separate frying pan sauté bacon and kidneys over a medium heat. When the kidneys are cooked add mushrooms and seasonings, cook for five minutes.

Pour contents of bacon pan into beef pan, simmer for ten minutes, add mild paprika, then the cream and bring to a low boil.

LEGENDARY DISHES

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Food Connections | Minced Meat Preparations

BALKANS BULGARIA NETHERLANDS SERBIA

Hacked or minced meat is dominant in Serbian food culture, in Ðevrek Pljeskavice (bagel-shaped veal burgers), Pljeskavice (beef burgers), Uštipci (stuffed meatballs) and significally the ground beef rissoles known as Ćevap or Ćevapčići.

The method for ćevap is almost unique to the Balkans, although the Bulgarians make a similar product called kebapcheta.

In the Netherlands they use the same method in the artisanal production of Slavinken.

Ćevap (Ćevapčići) – 1

  • 750 g beef, neck, cubed, minced
  • 250 g mutton / pork lean, minced
  • 45 ml water
  • 15 g black pepper
  • 10 g salt
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed, chopped

Remove gristle and fat from beef, salt and leave for two hours.

Mince all the meat with a good proportion of pepper.

Make a paste out of garlic and water.

Bring all ingredients together in a large bowl and knead until the fat in the meat starts to separate onto the hands.

Refrigerate for two hours.

Knead and shape into forefinger thick sausages.

Put back into fridge for an hour.

Grill until brown.


Ćevap (Ćevapčići) – 2

  • 1 kg beef, minced
  • 45 ml water
  • 10 g paprika, ground
  • 10 g salt
  • 10 g pepper
  • Olive oil, for greasing

Bring all ingredients together in a large bowl and knead until the fat in the meat starts to separate onto the hands. Leave to stand for an hour in a cold place.

Shape into croquettes, about 10cm long, 3cm thick.

Preheat oven to 200°C.

Oil a baking tray and place them together without touching each other.

Bake for 30 minutes.


Kebapcheta Кебапчета

Traditionally made with a pinch of soda and a little soda water these meat rissoles are popular throghout the Balkans and eastern Europe.

  • 450 g pork shank with 30% fat, minced
  • 450 g pork shoulder with 30% fat, minced
  • 100 g bacon, minced
  • 6 garlic cloves, minced (optional)
  • 150 ml soda water / water (optional)
  • 15 g black pepper
  • 15 g salt
  • 5 g caraway / cumin, ground
  • 1 g baking soda (optional)
  • Vinegar
  • Water

Combine the meat in a large bowl, add the seasonings, spices and, if using, the garlic.

If the soda version is preferred, add the soda and soda water or just water at this stage.

Knead for a couple of minutes. divide into 50 gram pieces.

Splash some vinegar into a bowl of water, dip hands in water, shape the pieces into long sausages, around 12 centimetre.

Refrigerate for at least eight hours.

Bake sausages on a hot grill, rotating each side for four turns.

Serve with salad.


Slavinken

The slavink was originally a songbird wrapped in a double combination of fatty bacon and pork fillet, and cooked under a hot grill. When this practice was frowned apon and banned in northern European countries, the fillet was wrapped around minced veal. Gradually minced pork was wrapped in bacon.

In the Netherlands slavinken are available ready-to-cook in the shops but they are better freshly made with a personal choice and quantity of seasonings.

  • 1 kg pork, minced
  • 450 g white bread loaf, sliced, crusts removed
  • 60 slices streaky bacon
  • 1 egg
  • 30 g nutmeg
  • 15 g black pepper
  • Butter, for frying
  • Water, for soaking

Soak bread in water for ten minutes.

Break the egg into a bowl, add nutmeg and pepper to taste.

Squeeze water out of the bread, add to bowl.

Add meat.

Knead the mixture until the fat begins to separate.

The assembly of slavinken is tedious, but necessary.

The amount of meat filling depends on the size of the bacon slices.

Arrange the wrapping for each slavink by placing two slices of bacon at right angles to each other, one slice off to the left like misplaced cross sticks. Place a third slice adjacent the upright left sided slice.

Spoon some stuffing across the width of the two slices. Shape into an oblong.

Looking at the arrangement from above, fold the bottom left slice over the stuffing, followed by the top right slice. Fold the end slices, on the left and right, on top of the previous slices. Finish by folding the remaining slices on the top left and the bottom right.

Melt butter in a frying pan over a high heat. Add sufficient slavinken to fill the pan. Sear quickly on each side. Reduce heat, cover the pan and fry for six minutes each side.

Repeat until all the slavinken are cooked.


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Indigenous Ingredients | Kale

It’s green it’s mean and it packs a punch

A coarse large-leaf cabbage with a curly crinkled appearance, kale is the cultivated variety of the wild cabbage native to the Mediterranean, and rich in minerals and vitamins.

The ancient Romans introduced it to northern Europe and today it is still popular in Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands, where recipes gradually found their way to the Atlantic fringe – Ireland, Portugal and Scandinavia in particular.

Curly kale is the most cultivated variety along with local varieties adapted to their environment, such as Portuguese kale (couve) used to make caldo verde.

Being the good collectors that they are, the Flemish took kale to their culinary hearts.

Kale is an essential ingredient in stoemp, a mash made with potatoes, leaf and root vegetables.

Cooked with butter and cream it forms part of the Danish grønlangkål med skinke – kale with ham and caramelised potatoes.

The combination of kale, butter, buttermilk or cream, potatoes and spring onions / scallions or leeks is believed to be one of the oldest dishes in northern Europe.

Kale has made a comeback in recent years, because the colder climates improves its flavour.


Colcannon
IRELAND
mashed kale and potatoes

  • 500 g kale
  • 500 g potatoes, whole
  • 10 leeks / spring onions / scallions, chopped
  • 150 ml cream / milk
  • 100 g butter / buttermilk
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Soak the kale in cold then warm water to remove dirt amd chase away the small spiders that love to weave their webs among its leaves.

Leave to drain for 30 minutes.

Remove stems, cut into leaves into strips then small pieces.

Bring to the boil in a little water, reduce heat and cook until al dente. Drain surplus water.

Boil the potatoes in their skins.

Cook the spring onions in the milk/cream over a low heat.

In a heavy based saucepan mash potatoes with the milk/cream and spring onions over a low heat.

Combine kale, seasoning and the butter, blend with a wooden spoon until the mash assumes the colour of the greens. Buttermilk can replace the butter to give a tangy taste.


Grønlangkål med Skinke
DENMARK
kale with ham and caramelised potatoes

Kale cooked with butter and cream is well known in northern countries. In Denmark it forms one of the country‘s traditional dishes when it is combined with pork in some form or other and served with caramelised potatoes.

  • 1 kg kale
  • 75 g butter
  • 30 ml cream
  • 30 g white wheat flour
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 5 g black pepper
  • 5 g salt

Potatoes

  • 1 kg Lammefjord potatoes
  • 50 g butter
  • 40 g sugar

Boil the potatoes in their skins, peel and leave to cool.

Heat sugar in a frying pan over a medium heat, add the butter. When it foams add the potatoes and coat in the sugar-butter mixture. Keep the heat controlled until the potatoes are browned and heated through. Make sure they do not burn.

Prepare kale.

Make a roux in a heavy based saucepan, add kale and two tablespoons of water. Cook over a medium heat, adding a little more butter, finishing with sugar, salt and pepper.

Serve with cooked smoked ham, pork sausages or pork on the bone.


Boerenkoolstamppot met Rookworst
NETHERLANDS
mashed kale and potatoes with smoked sausages

Another traditional kale dish, this mashed kale and potato stew is a Dutch classic with numerous subtle variations – kale, potatoes, milk and butter the only constants.

Smoked sausages (generally Gelderse) complete the dish but it is also garnished with bacon.

Vinegar is a tangy ingredient in some of the classic preparations, a role also played by mustard while the modern versions call for dried vegetables, herbs and spices.

Leeks have also been known to find their way into the ingredients list because they add a gentle flavour to the kale.

The Dutch ‘Food Web‘ list 162 recipes.

The Gelderland smoked sausage story is told by traditional food specialists Vers-inspiratie (Fresh Inspiration).

  • 1.5 kg floury potatoes, peeled, cubed
  • 1 kg kale leaves
  • 550 g smoked sausages
  • 300 g onions
  • 100 ml milk, hot
  • 30 g butter
  • 5 g black pepper
  • Salt, pinch
  • Mustard, for dressing

Boil onions and potatoes with a pinch of salt in sufficient water to cover in a large pot, strain, retaining the cooking liquid.

Put the kale in a large bowl with the liquid, cover and leave until leaves wilt.

Transfer kale and sufficient liquid to cover it to a saucepan, cover and simmer over a low heat for 15 minutes, drain, squeeze out liquid and chop small.

Put the sausages in the remaining liquid, cover and simmer over a low heat for 20 minutes.

Mash onions and potatoes with butter and milk, fold in the kale, season. Serve with pieces of sliced sausage dressed with mustard.


Other Traditional Kale Recipes

Caldo Verde PORTUGAL kale soup
Böreği / Börek TURKEY pies (kale is a filling)
Ekşili Pilav TURKEY bulgur with greens and yoghurt
Graupensuppe mit Kasseler GERMANY pearl barley soup with smoked pork neck
Hamsi Diblesi TURKEY Black Sea anchovies with kale and rice
Kiełbasa z Jarmuż POLAND smoked sausage with kale
Ostfriesische Grünkohl GERMANY kale with bacon, onions and sausages
Pierogi / Pīrāgi / Pirogi Пироги POLAND RUSSIA UKRAINE pies (minced beef, apple, kale and onion filling)
Solyanka Солянка RUSSIA winter soup pot
Sukuma Wiki EAST AFRICA braised greens
Vrzotovka SLOVENIA kale soup
Yaini CAUCASUS meat and vegetable soup

NETHERLANDS — Five Traditional Dishes

The ‘kapsalon’ in Spicy by Irene de Vette, a book about the ‘street of a thousand flavours’ in Rotterdam, where Dutch traditional food meets the traditional food of the world

The people of the Netherlands, more than any other in western Europe, have taken the food cultures of the world to their hearts, adapting them to their own tastes. This habits continues with the kapsalon, a fast-food assembly of everything Dutch and something a little exotic.

Spices are never that far away, especially the sweet spices, no less than nutmeg. A flavouring for stoemp, a mashed root vegetables dish that has its origins in the period before the Spanish ruled Holland and introduced the potato, nutmeg transforms this rustic dish.

However we prefer the version with kale, served with the smoked sausage of Gelderland.

We also like the snacks that started as accompaniements to beef in public houses and are now an essential fast food element – the bitterballen.

Bitterballen — puréed beef balls
Boerenkoolstamppot met Rookworst — kale and potato mash with smoked sausage
Kapsalon — chips, Gouda cheese, salad, sauce, shoarma meat
Kruidnootjes / Speculaas — spice balls / biscuits
Poffertjes — cheese / fruit buns


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[PLACE] ROTTERDAM | NETHERLANDS | Kruidnootjes (Spice Nuts)

The Spice People

VerstegensPeter
The Dutch love spices. Peter at Verstegens explains why.

Kruidnootjes

A freshly ground sweet spice mix is the starting point for these aromatic winter nuts. It can be bought ready packaged but home grinding and grating whole spices gives a fresh kick to these nuts. Traditionally the spice mix is 2:1 cinnamon to each of cloves, ginger and nutmeg with a lesser amount of white pepper. Intrepid bakers spice up this combination with cardamon, coriander, fennel and anise.

  • 250 g flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 15 g traditional spice mix (speculaas)
  • Salt, large pinch
  • 125 g brown sugar
  • 100 g butter 45 ml milk

Sift flour and baking powder into a large bowl, mixing in the spices and salt, add sugar, cut in the butter, the milk, one tablespoon at a time until the dough is firm but soft. Rest dough for one hour.

Preheat the oven to 150°C.

Cut the dough into 10 gram pieces, roll into balls and place on a lightly buttered baking tray.

Bake for 15-20 minutes, shorter for softer nuts, longer for harder.

Kruidnootjes are part of the gingerbread tradition associated with the spiced molded biscuits produced on Saint Nicholas Day – known as speculaas in Belgium and the Netherlands, spekulatius in Germany and as gingerbread throughout Europe.


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Legendary Dishes | Snert (pea soup)

Snert NETHERLANDS pea soup

Snert is the iconic staple dish of the Netherlands, a winter soup once found in railway station restaurants and high street cafes, with countless variations of the same basic recipe – dried whole or split peas, pig bones and marrow, pork meat and vegetables. Traditionally whole peas were soaked overnight, boiled in the soaking liquid with pig trotters slow cooked for several hours, left to tenderise in the jellied stock, then reheated. The double cooking of the peas is still essential to the method, less so the fatty and marrow bones, milk and potatoes which made the soup thick and hearty. A modern snert will contain smoked bacon, pork chops, smoked pork sausages and the ubiquitous stock vegetables – celeriac, carrots, leeks and onions, plus seasonings, usually celery leaves, parsley, pepper and salt. The following version combines the traditional with the modern.

  • 2 litres water
  • 1 pork hock / 2 pig trotters
  • 250 g potatoes, small, whole
  • 250 g smoked pork sausages
  • 200 g pork loin chop
  • 200 g split / whole peas
  • 2 celery stalks, chopped
  • 150 g carrots, chopped
  • 150 g celeriac, cubed
  • 100 g onions, chopped
  • 100 g smoked bacon
  • 1 leek, sliced thickly
  • Celery leaves handful, chopped
  • Salt, large pinch
  • Pepper, large pinch
  • Rye bread / toasted bread

Soak whole peas overnight, retaining the soaking liquid.

Bring the hock or trotters to the boil in the water in a heavy based saucepan. Skim off scum on the surface. Simmer for three hours with half of the carrots, all the celeriac, leeks, onions and chops.

Strain, leave to cool and remove meat from bones and chops.

Bring the stock, the soaking liquid of the peas and the peas to the boil. If using split peas add them at this stage.

Cook the peas for two hours until tender.

If using potatoes add them with the cooked meat, smoked bacon and pork sausages, the remaining carrots, and celery stalks. Cook for 15 minutes.

Season with salt, pepper and celery leaves.

Leave for at least four hours or overnight. Reheat slowly over a low heat.

Serve with slices of rye bread.


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[PLACE] ROTTERDAM | NETHERLANDS | Kapsalon (Hairdresser)

French fries coated with shoarma meat and melting Gouda cheese, topped with salad and served with a sauce, this is the Hairdresser!

The dish originated in 2003 when Nathaniel Gomes, the Cape Verdean owner of the Rotterdam hairdresser Tati, went to the shoarma shop El Aviva and asked for a dish with all this favourite ingredients.

It became a regular order, took its name, and is now very popular among young people in the Netherlands and Belgium.

At 1800 kcal the Hairdresser is a calorie bomb.

Shoarma (chicken, beef, lamb or turkey)
Baked fries
Grated cheese
Iceberg lettuce, sliced
Red onion, sliced
Sauces: garlic sauce, curry sauce, 
peanut sauce, ketchup or mayonnaise

The Hairdresser can also be made with chicken, doner, falafel, gyros or kebab.

 

Shoarma Mix

 

The spices for shoarma are variations of cardamon, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, cumin, ginger, mace, nutmeg and black, cayenne and paprika pepper.

This is a dry mix.

15 g coriander, ground
15 g cumin, ground
15 g garlic, powder
8 g cinnamon, ground
8 g paprika, ground
1 tsp black pepper, ground
1 tsp garam masala (optional)
1 tsp ginger, ground
1 tsp turmeric, ground
Cayenne, large pinch
Cloves, large pinch

This is a wet mix.

5 cloves garlic
120 ml lemon juice
60 ml apple cider vinegar
60 ml olive oil
1 onion, grated
1 tsp allspice
1 tsp cloves
1 tsp salt
1 tsp thyme
Caraway, large pinch
Cardamom, ground, large pinch
Cayenne, ground, large pinch
Cinnamon, ground, large pinch
Cumin, ground, large pinch
Ginger, ground, large pinch
Pepper, ground, large pinch

In the Netherlands, nutmeg would be added to these mixes.

 

Shoarma – 1

 
500g beef, lean, cut into strips
75 ml shoarma wet mix
15 ml sunflower oil

Marinate meat in the wet shoarma mixture overnight.

Brown meat in oil in a wide frying pan over a medium heat, about five minutes.

Preheat oven to 180°C.

Place meat in a small baking tray and spoon a tablespoon of the marinade over the top.

Cover with foil, bake for 20 minutes. Remove foil and bake for ten minutes.

Leave to rest for five minutes, then serve.

 

Shoarma – 2

 

500 g chicken, cut into strips
15 ml red/white wine vinegar
15 g shoarma dry mix
15 ml sunflower oil

Marinate meat in the shoarma spices overnight.

Brown meat in oil in a wide frying pan over a medium heat, about five minutes.

Preheat oven to 180°C.

Place meat in a small baking tray and spoon vinegar over the top.

Cover with foil, bake for 20 minutes. Remove foil and bake for ten minutes.

Leave to rest for five minutes, then serve.

 

Shoarma – 3

 

500 g lamb, lean, cut into strips
120 ml yoghurt
2 red peppers
30 ml olive oil
15 g shoarma dry mix
2 cloves garlic, crushed, chopped
Salt
Pepper

Marinade meat and peppers in oil and spices for an hour, separate meat.

Combine garlic, yoghurt and seasonings.

Brown meat in a wok over a high heat, add peppers, then the garlic-yoghurt mixture. Cook for five minutes.

Serve with hot pita, the sauce on the side, garnished with green chillies and lemon wedges.

 

Adapted from The Great European Food Adventure.


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