Tag: High Five

[Recipes of Europe] Switzerland 5

Swiss bakery is among the most diverse in Europe, rivalled only by the Turks. Here are four popular treats and a selection of small bread recipes (taken from our small breads book).

Butterzöpfe is the symbolic (Sunday) bread of Swiss bakery, flûtes au fromage are the wonderful cheese sticks from the Vaud canton, roggenbrot, the rye bread of the valleys, goes with air-dried meat, and birnenweggen is pear heaven.

DSCN6935
Milchbrötchen (milk bread rolls)
Birnenweggen
pear wedges

Brötchen
small bread rolls

Bernerköpf / Butterzöpfe
butter braids | Sunday Bread

Flûtes au Fromage 
cheese sticks

Pains de Seigle / Roggenbrot 
rye bread

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MACEDONIA — Five Traditional Dishes

Ottoman influences are strong in Macedonian food, but so are eastern Mediterranean flavours, which come together in baked dishes. Here are five favourites.

Moussaka — minced meat and potato bake
Pastrmajlija — baked paprika-flavoured flat bread with pork pieces
Selsko Meso — baked meat and mushrooms
Tavče Gravče — bean casserole
Turli Tava — baked meat and vegetables


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LUXEMBOURG — Five Traditional Dishes

Taking influences from their conquerors and neighbours, somehow the Luxembourgoise have managed to fashion a modest food culture they can call their own – largely because the ingredients are indigenous.

Bouneschlupp — bean soup
F’rell am Rèisleck — trout in riesling sauce
Judd mat Gaardebounen — smoked pork collar with broad bean sauce
Quetschentaart — damson tart
Tierteg potato — mash and sauerkraut


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LITHUANIA — Five Traditional Dishes

When the Lithuanians get on a roll the result is delicious.

Baklažano Suktinukai — aubergine rolls
Kiaulës Vyniotinis — pork roulade
Kepenėlių Pašteto Vyniotinis — liver paste roll
Mėsos Vyniotinis su Kiaušiniais — meat roll with eggs
Vištienos Suktinukai su Varškės Sūrio — chicken rolls with cottage cheese

When the Lithuanians get on a roll the result is delicious.


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LIECHTENSTEIN — Five Traditional Dishes

Despite Austrian, German and Swiss influence, the principality has managed to keep a few traditional dishes on its restaurant menus.

Älplermagronen — macaroni, potatoes, onion rings
Frikadellen Brötchen — meatballs in bread roll
Kalbsrahmgulasch mit Sauerrahmspätzle — veal stew with sour cream dumplings
Käseknöpfle — cheese dumplings
Rebl — crumbed polenta


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LATVIA — Five Traditional Dishes

High Fives

Latvian traditional food is remarkably indigenous, outrageously pagan, ridiculously varied and very old.

Pork features heavily, so here are five of their favourite pork dishes.

Kėdainių — pork mince pancakes
Cūkgaļas Rulete — pork and chicken roll
Kāpostu Tīteņi Golubci — stuffed cabbage with pork mince
Pīrāgi / Speķa Rauši — bacon bread
Sivēna Galerts — suckling pork in aspic


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ITALY — Five Traditional Dishes

Crispy, fried, hot – Italian comfort food.

Ciccioli Frolli Croccante — crispy pork snack Crescentina Calda / Gnocco Fritto — hot flat bread with bacon Crostini di Polenta — crispy fried corn squares
Frico e Patate e Cipolla — potato, cheese and onion fritters Fritto Misto Cotto — fried mixed fish

IRELAND — Traditional Food Profile

Wild-Atlantic-Lowres

Food in Ireland has always been defined by invaders, the Celts of eastern, northern and southern Europe and Anatolia, the Vikings, Anglo-Normans, Saxons and Britons, by countless migrants and by the relationships coastal and river people developed as traders with seafarers and travellers.

Early food was based on grains – barley, einkorn, oats, spelt – on dairy produce, on game meat, on inshore, lake and river fish, on eggs (domesticated and wild), on honey and on wild berries and fruit.

Porridge made with milk and oats is one of the oldest traditional dishes. Oats were used in numerous ways, in soups and stews, in confections like honeycomb, and as the essential ingredient in griddle bread. They were fermented to provide the leaven for bread, before bicarbonate of soda and baker’s yeast.

Cooking, curing and curdling methods were influenced by the invaders. The Vikings specialised in air-dried fish but it is likely that the tradition of salt-dried fish was brought from the Iberian peninsula. Whatever the origin, drying fish was a tradition around the Atlantic fringe.

Cockle, eel, haddock, herring, langoustine (Dublin bay prawn), mackerel, pike, salmon, trout and winkle provided protein for coastal, lake and river communities. Sea vegetables such as dulse and sloke were eaten as snacks, and cooked in breads and soups.

Meat from domesticated and wild birds (duck and goose in particular), small animals (hares and rabbits) and large animals (boar and deer) was common, and defined traditional dishes.

The event of the potato, brought by Basque fishermen in the mid-1600s, had a profound effect on traditional food. Usually cooked whole in their skins, a method that retained minerals and vitamins, the potato was used as a thickener for soups (early chowders, for example), as a bulking agent in stews and as a companion for countless dishes – boxty, champ, coddle, colcannon, pratie.

Kale-Art
Kale, the essential ingredient in colcannon

Nothing was wasted. Offal was mixed with pig’s blood and oats to make black pudding. Pig trotter’s were served whole or as an aromatic thickener in soups and stews. Sausage making utilised pork meat and biscuit rusk in a combination that was unique (the continentals put rusk in their meatballs – a tradition that never caught on in Ireland).

Mutton became an important food in the late 18th century. The consequence was Irish stew, made initially with mutton, potatoes, onions and salt, then much latter with other root vegetables and herbs.

Bread making went through countless adaptations in the early 19th century as new ingredients were introduced, and produce and products from overseas – bicarbonate of soda, dried fruit, molasses, soft wheat, spices and sugar – led to the beginnings of many of the dishes now associated with Irish traditional food.

Cakes and confections proliferated, influenced by migrants from France, Italy and Switzerland who introduced home bakeries and ice cream parlours.

Breakfast became the most important meal of the day, and epitomised traditional food, continuing to this day. Depending on the region, breakfast included a combination of foods from bacon rashers, black and white puddings, fried eggs, pork-rusk sausages, potatoes in their various disquises, white soda bread and steak sausages followed by wheaten soda bread and scones with butter, jams and preserves, milky tea or coffee with hot milk. Fast breakfast was fadge – bacon, eggs and potato cakes.

The concept of meat, vegetables and potatoes on a plate probably started in Ireland. Now bacon / gammon / ham, cabbage and mashed potatoes / chipped potatoes or roast stuffed pork, carrots, gravy and mashed potatoes / chipped potatoes or sirloin steak, crispy onion and mashed potatoes / chipped potatoes are thought of as traditional dishes.


PEOPLE PLACE PRODUCE

O'Connells
Fish brothers O’Connell at the English market in Cork city

Antrim Dexter Beef

Aran Sweet Beef

Ardagh Castle Goats Cheese – goat’s milk

Armagh Apple Juice

Atlantic Battered Hake

Atlantic Carrageen

Atlantic Crab

Atlantic Dulse

Atlantic Pan-Fried Mackerel

Beal Cheddar – cow’s milk

Ballyhooly Blue Cheese – cow’s milk 

Beara Blue Cheese – cow’s milk

Beara Pan-Fried Mackerel

Belfast Bap

Belfast Bookies Sandwich

Bellingham Blue Cheese – cow’s milk

Brotchán Foltchep (leek and oatmeal soup)

Cais Dubh Cheese – cow’s milk 

Cais Rua Cheese – cow’s milk 

Carlow Cheese – cow’s milk 

Elizabeth Bradley at her cheese stall

Carrowholly Cheese – cow’s milk 

Cape Clear Mackerel

Cavan Boxty (potato cakes, potato dumplings)

Cleire Goats Cheese – goat’s milk

Connemara Chowder (carrageen, dulse, potatoes, mussels)

Connemara Hill Lamb*

Connemara Potato Cakes

Connemara Rowanberry Jelly

Connemara Scallops

Connemara Scones

Connemara Scones made with buttermilk

Coolattin Cheddar Cheese – cow’s milk 

Cooleeney Farmhouse Cheese – cow’s milk 

Cork Drisheen (black / blood pudding)

Corleggy Cheese – goat’s milk


Creeny Cheese – ewe’s milk

Dexter Beef / Marshalls’ Dexter Beef

Dilliskus Cheese – cow’s milk with seaweed

Dingle Smoked Mackerel Pâté

Donegal Champ / Stelk (mashed potatoes and scallions)

Donegal Potato Faros

Donegal Dexter Beef / Marshalls’ Dexter Beef

Donegal Oysters

Drumlin Cheese – cow’s milk

Dublin Coddle (modern version)

Emerald Cheese – cow’s milk

Galway Bay Lobsters

Galway Bay Oysters

Glebe Brethan Cheese – cow’s milk

Hibernia Cheese – cow’s milk 

Inismaan Chowder (sea vegetables and potatoes)

Irish Breakfast Bap / Roll

Irish Coffee*

Irish Stew

Irish Fry

Irish Sea Battered Prawns (scampi)

Kerry Blue Cheese – cow’s milk

Kerry Salt Cod

Kilcummin – cow’s milk

Killary Mussels*

Knockanore Plain Cheese – cow’s milk

Knockatee Cheddar Cheese – cow’s milk

Knockatee Gouda Cheese – cow’s milk

Leitrim Fadge

Limerick Ham*

Lough Neagh Eels

Lough Neagh Pollan

Louth Spelt Berries

Louth Spelt Flour

AndrewWorkman&SpeltField
Andrew Workman at one of his spelt fields in Lough

Maighean Cheese – cow’s milk

Millhouse Cheese – sheep’s milk

Mount Callan Cheddar Cheese – cow’s milk

St Brigid Cheese – cow’s milk 

St Brigid Beag – Cheese cow’s milk with green peppercorns

St Gall Cheese – cow’s milk 

Tipperary Barm / Round Brack* 

Tipperary Pies

Triskel Dew Drop Cheese – goat’s milk

Triskel Gwenned Cheese – cow’s milk

Ulster Fry

Ulster Steak Sausages

Waterford Blaa Bread

Waterford Blaa Steak Sandwich

Wexford Honey Mousse


*Indicates potential Geographic Indicator Status


SELECTED INDIGENOUS PRODUCE

carlow-jimmy-mulhall
Jimmy Mulhall collecting his vegetables at Carlow street market

Apple (Bramley, Crab)

Beef

Brown Trout / Sea Trout

Cabbage

Carrageen

Carrot

Cauliflower

Crab

Duck

Dulse

Eel

Egg

Goose

Haddock

Hake 

Kale / Curly Kale

Lamb

Lemon Sole 

Lobster

Mackerel

Mussel

Onion

Oyster

Pea

Plaice

Pollan

Pork including belly and trotter (cruibín)

Potato

Poultry

Prawn

Rowanberry

Salmon

Scallop

Spring Onion / Scallion


SELECTED TRADITIONAL CUISINE

Aran Islands cow

Baked Crusted Salmon

Baked Crusted Salmon

Baked Sea Trout

Black (Blood) Pudding (drisheen) and White Pudding

Bookies Sandwich rump or sirloin steak with onions in a bread roll

Boxty potato cakes / potato dumplings

Burren Smokehouse Salmon

Buttermilk Scones

Cabbage and Bacon / Gammon / Ham

Carrageen Jelly*

Carrageen, Mackerel and Potato chowder

Carvery roast beef / roast pork with potatoes, leaf and root vegetables

Champ / Stelk mashed potatoes and scallions

Coddle bacon, gammon, ham hock, onions, potatoes, sausages with kale 

Colcannon buttermilk, kale and potatoes

Cruibín (pig’s trotters)

Fadge bacon, eggs and potato cakes or boxty

Farm Eggs

Farmhouse Cultured Butter

Pan-Fried Mackerel

Pan-Fried Sea Trout

Pork Sausages

Porter Cake

Potato Farls

Potted Crab

Roast Chicken

Rowanberry Jelly

Scones – Spelt

Scones – Wheat

Smoked Mackerel

Smoked Salmon

Soda Bread – Spelt

Soda Bread – White Wheat

Soda Bread – Wholewheat

Spelt Bread

Steak and Chips with Crispy Onions

Steak Sausages

Stiffner mashed potatoes with buttermilk

Sultana Scones

Tea Brack

Wheaten Bread

Wild Garlic Soup

Yellowman sugar confection


RECIPES

… to follow

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ICELAND — Five Traditional Dishes

Five haddock dishes from Cool Cuisine, Nanna Rögnvaldardóttir’s stunning overview of Icelandic tradition food.

Soðin Ýsa — poached haddock
Steikt Ýsa í raspi — breaded pan-fried haddock
Djúpsteiktur fiskur — deep-fried battered fish
Pepperoni Ýsa — pepperoni haddock
Plokkfiskur — mashed haddock and potatoes


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HUNGARY — Five Traditional Dishes

Budapest Agent on traditional goulash / gulyás.

‘If you come to Hungary and want the goulash you should order a pörkölt, which you get in nearly every restaurant. Pörkölt is so popular that you even find festivals where Hungarians challenge themselves to make the best, with loads of pálinka and a big celebration at the end.’

Budapest Agent

Paprika, of course, is the essential ingredient, so five paprika dishes.

Lecsó — onion, paprika, green and red pepper, tomato sauce

Gulyásleves — beef and vegetable paprika soup

Paprikás Csirke — chicken in creamy paprika sauce

Pörkölt — beef / lamb / pork and paprika stew

Tokány — beef, mushrooms, paprika, pork, pork kidney, smoked bacon, sour cream, herbs and spices stew


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GREECE — Five Traditional Dishes

Classic traditional dishes.

Dolmadákia — stuffed grape leaves
Halvás — sweet rice / semolina cake
Kleftiko — slow-cooked lamb
Moussakás — aubergine and minced meat bake
Thalassiná — seafood pilaf


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GIBRALTAR — Five Traditional Dishes

The traditional dishes of Gibraltar have their origins across the Mediterranean coastal regions.

Calentita — chickpea fritters (Italian)
Bollo de Hornasso — sweet bread (Spanish)
Fideos al Horno — baked noodles with cheese and ham (Mediterranean islands)
Rolitos — beef rolls (Maltese)
Rosto — pasta with meat and vegetable in tomato sauce (Italian)


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GERMANY — Five Traditional Dishes

Stuffed duck of Lübeck

People, Place, Produce. German cuisine is characterised by its regional produce and the myriad products that have emerged from it. Whether it is the beef that is sourced for sauerbraten, the soured beef of Bavaria and the Rhineland or the duck of Lübeck preferred for stuffing or the young herrings called matjes caught between the first of May and the last day of August that are an essential ingredient in labskaus, the sea farers dish associated with the fishers and sailors who frequented the Baltic and North seas, or the cured smoked pork known as kasseler found in countless recipes. So, with Germany, we decided to break from the single five format and suggest three sets of five traditional dishes.

Potato!

Bratkartoffeln mit Speck und Zwiebeln
— fried potatoes with bacon and onions

Gefüllte Kartoffeln
— stuffed potatoes with cheese and eggs

Kartoffeln mit Äpfeln and Bratwürst
— potatoes with apple and sausage

Kartoffelpuffer / Reiberdatschi mit Apfelmus
— potato pancakes with apple sauce

Kartoffelsalat
— potato salad


Bread!

Dinkelbrot
— spelt bread

Laugengeback / Laugenbrötchen
— lye breads

Lebkuchen
— gingerbread

Roggen Sauerteigbrot
— rye sourdough bread

Stollen
— fruit bread


Place!

Bayerische & Rheinische Sauerbraten
— soured meat

Lübecker Ente
stuffed duck with sauce

Hamburger Labskaus
— cured beef, herring, beetroot, potato, onion stew

Leipziger Allerlei
— vegetables, crabs, crab butter, bread dumplings

Ostfriesische Teebrötchen
— cake-bread rolls


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GEORGIA — Five Traditional Dishes

To say that the Georgians have a unique way with meat is an understatement, especially when one of their most popular dishes is meat-free, the stuffed bread called khachapuri.

Abkhazura — beef / pork, caul fat, coriander, fenugreek, sumac meatballs
Khashi — beef broth
Khinkali — peppered lamb / mutton / veal dumplings
Mtsvadi — shish kebab
Muzhuzhi — mixed marinaded pork


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FRANCE — Five Traditional dishes

Traditional food in rural France means pork, but poultry – chicken of all sizes, duck, goose, turkey – and various fowl are always in the mix.

Dindonneau Rôti Farci aux Marrons — young turkey stuffed with chestnuts
La Fricassée de Poulet — sautéed chicken in egg sauce
Oie Rôtie aux Fruits — roast goose with apples and pears / dried apricots and prunes
Paté de Canard d’Amiens — duck paté
Perdrix Braisées — braised partridges

FINLAND — Five Traditional Dishes

Fish, fresh and sea water, remain an essential aspect of the country’s traditional food, yet this is a country with a gastronomic diversity that is fairly unique.

Hiillostettua Lohta ja Korvasienimuhennosta — grilled salmon and creamed morels
Kalakeitto — fish soup
Kalakukko — fish pastie
Kuharullat Punajuurikastikkeella — pike-perch rolls in beetroot froth
Silakka Pihviä — herring cakes

Recipes

ESTONIA — Five Traditional Dishes

Estonia has always been defined by its indigenous food culture, so much that today it celebrates this fact with a strong emphasis on traditional ingredients. Sprats and herring from the Baltic are still popular. Root vegetables, especially beet, have not lost their allure. And despite outside influences the homemade blood sausage remains sacroscant. It is a work of art, unlike any other blood sausage in Europe, and easily made in the home made with bay leaf, barley, belly pork, garlic, marjoram, onions, pig’s blood, pork, spices.

Kilusalat — sprat, potato and onion salad
Isetehtud Verivorstid — homemade blood sausage
Peedi Salat koos Jogurti — beetroot salad with yoghurt
Räime Pirukas — herring pies
Räimepihvid — pan-fried herring

ENGLAND — Five Traditional Dishes

To the naive tourist and the romantic patriot, traditional English food is:

  • apple crumble and custard
  • black pudding
  • cottage pie
  • crumpet or muffin
  • fish and chips
  • hot pot
  • meat and vegetable pastie
  • pie and mash and parsley sauce
  • pork pie
  • roast beef
  • roast pork and crackling
  • sausage and mash
  • sausage rolls
  • steamed pudding
  • trifle jelly and ice cream
  • etc …

While the French and Italian influence is never far away, the major influence on traditional eating in England has been from Asia and the Indian sub-continent.

Here are five dishes from 21st century ethnic England.

Chicken Tikka Masala — chicken in spicy yoghurt sauce
Masala Dosa — fried onion, potato and spice wrap
Rogan Josh — spicy almond and lamb curry
Sweet and Sour Chicken / Pork / Prawn
Thai Green Curry — chicken / pork / prawn, coconut milk, herbs, shrimp paste, spices

CZECHIA — Five Traditional Dishes

Five traditional dishes with pork in various clothes.

Bramborová Polévka — potato soup with bacon and sausage
Lesnická Šunka — ham in bacon, mushroom wine sauce
Pečená Vepřová panenka na Česneku — roast pork tenderloin with garlic
Vepřový Řízek — pork schnitzel
Zbojnická Pečínka — pork stew

CYPRUS — Five Traditional Dishes

From the heart of Cyprus. If only every tourist organisation in Europe got it together to employ someone like Filakia Tonia to research and write a booklet on its traditional food. Here are five suggestions from her wonderful little book, Food From The Heart of Cyprus.

Afelia — liver/pork marinated in coriander seeds and red wine
Fasolaki Yiahni — bean and Feta cheese (lamb – optional) stew
Kleftiko — baked lamb
Makaronia tou Fournou — macaroni, cheese and meat bake
Tahini —garlic, lemons, olive oil, tahini paste


Flavours of Cyprus
Food From The Heart of Cyprus

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