Tag: Euro Snacks

Legendary Dishes | Samosa (spicy meat, vegetable pastry)

EUROPE INDIAN SUB-CONTINENT

There is huge appreciation for the countless chefs who make these innocuous pastries every day by those who know the elaborate process. Among the best Fricot have encountered over the years are the samosas in the Sanaam Restaurant in the south Manchester village of Rusholme. Revered for its sweet confectons, the Sanaam’s chefs are adept with the savory delights – bhaji, pakora, panipuri, paratha and the samosa. One of the secrets of a perfect samosa is the crust.

Garam Masala – spice mixture

  • ½ cm cinnamon
  • 2 black peppercorns
  • 1 green cardamom
  • 1 clove
  • ½ tsp cumin seeds
  • ½ tsp fennel seeds
  • 1 tsp coriander seeds
  • 1 tsp pomegranate seeds
  • 1 tsp mango powder

Blend all ingredients except the mango powder into a coarse mixture, combine mango powder at the end.

Pastry

  • 400 g white wheat flour
  • 250 ml kefir / yoghurt
  • 75 g hazelnuts, ground
  • 3 tbsp rapeseed oil
  • 1 tsp ajwain / lovage seeds
  • Salt, pinch

Combine flour, kefir or yoghurt, 2 tablespoons of oil, salt, form into a dough, add seeds. Coat dough in remaining oil, place in a bowl, cover with clingfilm. Rest dough in refrigerator for at least an hour.

Filling — Meat

  • 500 g meat, minced
  • 300 g onion, sliced thin
  • 45 g garam masala
  • 30 ml olive oil / rapeseed oil
  • 2 cm ginger, chopped small
  • 10 g black pepper
  • Salt, large pinch

Carmelise onions in oil over a low heat for 30 minutes, increase heat, add meat, brown. Season with spices, pepper and salt, leave to cool. Blend ginger with a little water into a paste. Work paste into meat mixture.

Vegetable Samosa

Filling — Vegetable

  • 350 g waxy potatoes, boiled, peeled, mashed
  • 150 g fresh green peas
  • 30 g garam masala
  • 2 cm ginger, chopped small
  • 1 green chilli, chopped small
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds, whole
  • Asafoetida, pinch
  • Red chilli powder, pinch
  • Salt, pinch

Blend chilli and ginger with a little water into a paste. Work paste, asafoetida, chilli powder, cumin seeds, garam masala and salt into the mashed potatoes. Add peas.

Finish

Cut dough into 30 gram pieces, shape into balls, roll each into 12 cm rounds. Divide the vegetable filling into 25 gram oblongs and the meat filling into 20 gram balls, place in the centre of the rounds, fold over and seal using a fork to impress a pattern on the edge. Deep fry each samosa at 190ºC until golden brown, about 8 minutes.

Legendary Dishes | Pesto (basil paste)

Pesto has origins in several Italian regions. Like the pizza and its association with Naples, the most famous pesto is an iconic traditional dish of Genoa.

Pesto

  • 180 g parmigiano / grana padano, fine grated
  • 120 ml olive oil
  • 100 g basil leaves
  • 60 g pecorino / sardoor / toscano, fine grated
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 30 g pine nuts
  • 10 g sea salt

Pound basil with garlic, about 30 leaves for every clove. Use salt to aid grinding.

When the mixture turns into a bright green liquid, add pine nuts. Pound until incorporated.

Add Italian cheese of your choice, then the oil a drop at a time until the consistency is just right.

Fresh pesto is dangerous. Use your imagination and don’t eat too much in one go.


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Legendary Dishes | Tapénade (anchovy and caper olive oil paste)

Tapénade FRANCE anchovy and caper olive oil paste
Tapénade, a dish of the Provençal region of south-east France and specific to Marseille, was originally made by pounding fresh capers with anchovy fillets in a mortar, gradually drizzling olive oil and lemon juice into the mixture, finishing with a grinding of black pepper. This mixture was added to pounded hard-boiled egg yolks and stuffed into halved eggs, then served as an hors d’œuvre. Over time stoned black olives were added to give the tapénade depth, and to allow it to be served pâté-like. Some recipes called for tuna fish, others for garlic, herbs and mustard. Tapénade remains a dish of Provence, because the ingredients – especially the capers (which give this sauce its name) – need to be fresh.

Tapénade – 1

  • 100 g anchovy fillets
  • 100 g capers, fresh
  • 30 ml olive oil
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • Black pepper, pinch
  • Brandy, splash

plus …

  • 8 hard-boiled eggs, halved length-wise, yolks retained
Pound the anchovies and capers in a mortar (or blender), add oil, brandy and sufficient lemon juice to make a sauce, thicken with the hard-boiled yolks, season with pepper.
Stuff the mixture into the eggs, serve with a drizzle of the tapénade over each halved egg.

Tapénade – 2

  • 240 ml olive oil (quantity with garlic and olives)
  • 100 g anchovies
  • 100 g capers
  • 100 g black olives, de-seeded (optional)
  • 1 lemon, juice
  • 4 cloves garlic (optional)
  • Pepper

The quick method is with the food processor. Garlic and olives enrich this paste. If that is your choice, blend the anchovies, capers, garlic, onions and lemon juice. Strain through a sieve, then blend again with the oil and pepper. For the simpler version, pound anchovies and capers in a mortar with the lemon juice, adding sufficient oil to produce a creamy smooth texture. Spread on fresh white bread.


Tapénade – 3

  • 275 g black olives, pitted
  • 100 g anchovies in olive or sunflower oil
  • 100 g capers, fresh or brined
  • 100 g tuna in oil (optional)
  • 60 ml olive oil
  • 1 lemon, large, juiced
  • 10 g mustard
  • 4 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 bay leaf, crushed
Blend everything in a food processor, serve on toasted fresh bread.

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GLOSSARY     HIGH FIVES     LEGENDARY DISHES     
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Legendary Dishes | Baklava (syrup pastries)

Baklava has been making a westwards journey for thousands of years, gradually moving from Damascus in Syria into Gaziantep in south-east Anatolia onto Istanbul where it became associated with the janissaries during ramadan.

The baklava procession started by Süleyman in the 16th century is never-ending as the fame of this sweet pastry continues to spread.

Turkish baklava is now characterised by its relationship with the pistachios and walnuts grown in eastern Anatolia, but a long time ago it was made with clotted cream, and sometimes with nothing more than a sugar syrup.

This is the ‘ordinary’ baklava.

Baklava

Butter

  • 500 g butter

Dough

  • 1 kg durum wheat white flour
  • 10 ml lemon juice
  • 10 g salt
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • Water

Rolling Flour

  • 50 g corn starch / fine polenta flour
  • 50 g flour

Syrup

  • 750 g sugar
  • 350 g water

Whisk soda into juice. Sieve flour onto a clean work surface, make a well and add salt, juice-soda liquid and sufficient water to form a soft dough. Knead and divide into 12 equal pieces.

Leave to rest for 15 minutes.

Combine the two batches of rolling flour.

Melt the butter.

Roll out each piece of dough, about 25 centimetres in width.

Brush butter on nine pieces, place three pieces on top of each other to make three piles, top each one with an unbuttered piece.

Leave to rest for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 200°C and grease baking tray.

Roll each pastry pile, folding the pastry over the rolling pin to stretch it, paper-thin, less than 1 millimetre. Cut the pastry into sheets the size of the baking tray.

Place a sheet of pastry on the bottom, brush with butter. Repeat with remaining sheets.

Cut the pastry into diamond shapes, slicing deep.

Brush the top of each diamond with a liberal amount of butter.

Bake at 180°C for 25 minutes, until golden brown.

Make a syrup with sugar and water. Leave it to cool, pour over the baklava.


Gaziantep Baklava

The butter-sweet aromatic baklava made in Gaziantep with local pistachios is the most iconic and traditional of these Turkish confections. Golden on top, bright green in the middle, syrupy yellow on the bottom, the Gaziantep Baklava has no substitute.

Making it requires skill and patience. Enjoy the experience, and share the magic with the artisans of Gaziantep.

Afterall they have been hand-making baklava since the days of Gilgamesh!

Butter

  • 1 kg butter, salt-free
  • 500 g Antep pistachios (Antep fıstığı), chopped
  • 100 g wheat starch

Dough

  • 1 kg durum wheat white flour
  • 3 eggs
  • 10 g salt
  • Water

Filling

  • 500 g milk
  • 50 g semolina

Rolling Flour

  • 75 g corn starch / fine polenta flour
  • 75 g flour

Syrup

  • 750 g sugar
  • 350 g water

Sieve flour onto a clean work surface, make a well and break in the eggs, salt and sufficient water to form a soft dough. Knead and divide into 12 equal pieces. Leave to rest for 15 minutes.

Boil milk vigorously, add semolina and stir until the mixture begins to thicken. Leave to cool.

Combine the two batches of rolling flour.

Melt the butter.

Roll out each piece of dough, about 25 centimetres in width.

Brush butter liberally on nine pieces, place three pieces on top of each other to make three piles, top each one with an unbuttered piece.

Leave to rest for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 180°C and grease baking tray.

Roll each pastry pile, folding the pastry over the rolling pin to stretch it, paper-thin, less than 1 millimetre. Cut the pastry into sheets the size of the baking tray.

Place a sheet of pastry on the bottom, sprinkle with wheat starch, a thin layer of semolina cream, and an even layer of pistachios. Repeat with all but the last sheet.

Cut the pastry into equal diamond shapes, slicing deep.

Brush the top of each diamond with a liberal amount of remaining butter.

Bake for 25 minutes, until golden brown.

Make a syrup with sugar and water. Leave to cool, pour over the baklava diamonds.


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BRÖTCHEN | Huffa ENGLAND breakfast bread roll

Breakfast breads come in all shapes and sizes, long like baguettes, short like buns, round like rolls, flat like baps. Every region has its colloquial name for this bread, but generally its purpose is the same.

It acts as a container for a hearty breakfast.

The breakfast bap is claimed by the Scots, but they are not alone.

In the south-east of England, railway station buffets and cafes offer a selection of grilled bacon and sausages in large round flat breads called huffa to hurried travellers and early workers.

One such cafe sits to the back of the London platform at Manningtree station in Essex, a stone’s throw from the county border with Suffolk. Here they serve a soft flat bread called a huffa, which the customer orders with a choice of breakfast foods, to eat in or take away.

This is the huffa, one of its kind!

  • 450 g strong white flour, warmed
  • 280 ml milk, warmed
  • 25 g yeast
  • 15 ml milk, for glazing
  • 15 g salt

Sieve flour and salt into a large bowl, dry whisk and put in a warm place for a couple of hours.

Heat milk to 38°C.

Dissolve yeast in two tablespoons of the milk.

Pour remaining milk and yeast liquid into the flour, form into a ball of dough, fold out onto a floured surface, knead for 15 minutes.

Leave for an hour, degas, leave for another hour, cut into 12 equal pieces, shape into flat rounds and place on two warmed baking trays dusted with flour. Leave to rise for 30 minutes.

Desired dough temperature 25°C.

Preheat oven to 220°C.

Bake for 20 minutes.

Place on a wire rack, brush surface with milk. When the milk has dried on the surface, dust lightly with a sprinkling of flour.


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GLOSSARY     HIGH FIVES     LEGENDARY DISHES     
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Legendary Dishes | Makowiec (poppy seed cake)

POLAND
PoppySeedFillingTin

There is a delicate balance between the subtle ingredients of this cake. For that reason small is always beautiful.

In Poland the poppy seed filling is a commercial product sold in tins and the pastry dough can also be bought in shops and supermarket.

We first heard about this cake many years ago after a soccer game in north London, where a young very drunk homesick man said he missed his makowiec, and went on to explain what it was, making his misery so much worse.

Dough

  • 225 g pastry flour
  • 100 ml milk, lukewarm
  • 60 g butter, softened
  • 40 g vanilla sugar
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 25 g yeast

Filling

  • 125 g poppy seeds
  • 125 icing sugar
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • 25 g butter, softened
  • 15 g walnuts
  • 15 g raisins
  • Brandy, splash
  • 1 orange, zest

Topping

  • 120 g icing sugar
  • 30 g candied orange peel, diced small
  • 30 g walnuts, chopped small
  • 20 ml lemon juice

Dissolve yeast in milk, sugar and two tablespoons flour. Leave to rise for 15 minutes.

In a large bowl whip egg yolks with sugar into an airy cream.

Melt butter and add half to egg yolk cream.

Sieve remaining flour and add it, with remaining butter, to the egg cream.

Knead for ten minutes into a smooth dough. Leave to rise for an hour. Degas once, leave to rise for 30 minutes.

Pour sufficient boiling water over poppy seeds to submerge them completely. When they have absorbed the water, grind in a food processor to a paste.

Put paste in a large bowl, add brandy, butter, nuts, raisins and zest.

Whip egg yolks with sugar, add to poppy seed mixture, finally the egg whites. Leave for 15 minutes.

Roll the dough into a thin rectangular sheet on a floured surface. Spread rhe poppy seed mixture over the central area of the dough. Fold the dough over to make a roulade.

Leave to rise for an hour.

Preheat oven to 175°C.

Bake for 35 minutes.

Combine icing sugar and lemon juice, spread over top of the cake, decorate with candied fruit and walnuts.


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Legendary Dishes | Calamaretti Fritti (fried squid)

ITALY

In trattoria throughout Sicily, baby squid hardly bigger than a marble are deep fried and served with lemon halves, sometimes with Italian chilli flakes. They can be made with larger members of the squid family, but these baby squid are a delicacy to be savoured.

  • 900 g baby squid
  • White flour
  • Sunflower oil
  • Lemons
  • Milk
  • Salt

Wash, then dry squid. Dust with flour, fry in an instant in smoking oil in a deep frier.

Another method calls for the squid to be dusted in flour, drenched in milk, then in oil and deep fried.

The intense heat seals the fish and prevents the ink sack from bursting.

Legendary Dishes | Stjerneskud Smørrebrød (‘shooting star’ open sandwich)

DENMARK

A shooting star because this is the most famous of the smørrebrød range of Danish open-faced sandwiches. These are the ingredients for one portion.

  • 3 plaice fillets
  • 6 large shrimp, cooked
  • 30 g sour cream
  • 15 g caviar
  • 1 slice of brown bread / dark rye bread
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • Egg, hard boiled, halved
  • 1 lemon, juice
  • Asparagus piece
  • Breadcrumbs
  • Butter
  • Cayenne, pinch
  • Cucumber slice, twisted
  • Dill, pinch
  • Lemon slice, twisted
  • Lettuce piece
  • Paprika, pinch
  • Salmon slice
  • Sunflower oil
  • Tomato, sliced
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Speed is of the essense with this dish.

Whip a pinch each of cayenne and paprika into sour cream, mix in caviar.

Bring a steamer pot of salted water to the boil, turn heat low and place a fillet in the tray, cover and leave for three minutes. Roll up.

Heat a small piece of butter in a frying pan with a splash of oil.

Break and beat an egg into one dish, put breadcrumbs in a second dish, coat a fillet in the egg, then the breadcrumbs. Fry each side, two minutes each. Repeat with final fillet.

Toast the slice of bread, butter it, place one or two small leaves of lettuce on top, followed by the fish.

Garnish with shrimp, and a large splash of lemon juice.

Spoon cream mixture on top.

Finish with the salmon rolled around the asparagus, tomato slices, twisted cucumber and lemon slices, the egg halves and the dill.

Legendary Dishes | Quetschentaart (plum tart)

LUXEMBOURG

Quetschentaart is a tart made from the damsons native to central and western Europe. Called Quetscheflued, Zwetschgenkuchen or Zwetschgenfladen in Austria, Germany and Switzerland where it is most popuar, Quetschentaart is one of Luxembourg’s national dishes. This is a recipe from the turn of the 20th century.

Quetschentaart in Luxembourg is still made with variations of this yeast pastry.

  • 600 g white wheat flour
  • 60 plums, halved, pitted
  • 160 ml milk, lukewarm
  • 80 g butter
  • 25 g yeast
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 50 g sugar

This quantity will make two large pies in 26-30 centimetre diameter pie moulds.

Activate the yeast in half the milk with a tablespoon of flour. Leave to froth, about 20 minutes.

Combine the remaining flour with salt, the remaining milk and butter. Knead into a soft dough.

Preheat oven to 180°C.

On a floured surface, roll dough thinly, cut out two rounds with a sufficient diameter to leave an overlap at the edges of your moulds. Cut two rounds to fit over the top.

Lightly place the dough into the base. Leave both sets of dough to rise for 30 minutes.

Pack the plums tightly against each other, skin side down to keep the juice in. Sprinkle with sugar.

Cover with the remaining rounds, seal the edges.

Bake for 30 minutes.

Legendary Dishes | Crescentina (bacon bread)

ITALY

Crescentina – 1

This focaccia-like bread of Bologna has also lost some of its grandeur, no longer a regular in bakeries and restaurants, largely because it is a home-baked food subject to countless variations.

And because it needs to be eaten fresh from the oven.

Some cooks swear by the lean bacon version, others insist the fat in the bacon is essential for flavour and appearance, and the odd cook in five believes in mixing all the ingredients together before proving.

  • 400 g strong white flour
  • 300 g water, lukewarm
  • 100 g fat / lean bacon / pork belly, minced
  • 20 g yeast
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • Olive oil
  • Salt, pinch

Dissolve yeast in the sugar and water.

Combine salt, flour and yeast water to form a dough. Turn out onto a floured surface, knead for 15 minutes until elastic and smooth, albeit still sticky. Leave to rise for 45 minutes, degas, leave to rise for 30 minutes.

Work bacon or pork into the dough, making sure it is distributed evenly.

Set oven to 240°C. After five minutes place a rectangular baking tray in the oven. Remove and spread a splash of oil over the warm tray.

Roll the dough out to the size of the tray and with a forceful finger action push it toward the edges. Be careful not to puncture the dough. It must be even across the tray. Cover and leave to rise for one hour.

Turn oven down 20°.

Bake for ten minutes.

It will be almost ready when the top and bottom take on a golden colour. This is the desired effect, as a consequence of the fat in the bacon/pork. The crumb should be soft.

Take the tray out and loosen bread free with two long spatulas.

Place a wire rack on top of the bread, flip over, slide back onto the tray and bake for another five minutes.

Cut into squares, eat hot.


Crescentina – 2

  • 400 g strong white flour
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 100 ml milk, lukewarm
  • 100 g mix of ham, mortadella, pancetta
  • 100 ml olive oil
  • 100 ml sparkling water
  • 20 g yeast
  • 15 g garlic, chopped
  • 1 tsp rosemary, chopped
  • Salt

Dissolve yeast in the milk.

Combine salt, flour, oil and yeast milk to form a dough. Turn out onto a floured surface, knead for 15 minutes until elastic and smooth. Leave to rise for 45 minutes, degas, leave to rise for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 220°C.

Divide the dough into 75g pieces, incorporate garlic, onion, rosemary and meat.

Roll each piece into thin sheets, cut into irregular shapes, score with a fork.

Place on two oiled baking trays.

Bake for 20 minutes at 200°C.


Crescentina – 3 (Gnocco Fritto)

  • 500 g strong white flour
  • 325 ml milk, lukewarm
  • 75 g vegetable oil
  • 20 g yeast
  • Salt, pinch

Dissolve yeast in milk. Add to flour and salt.

Work into an elastic dough and leave to rise for an hour.

Roll out into a sheet 5cm thick, cut into large diamonds and deep fry in vegetable oil.

Drain on paper towels.


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