Legendary Dishes | Pâté de Canard d‘Amiens (duck pate)

FRANCE

This duck pâté, apparently a 17th century invention, is still popular despite many changes to the original recipe. This version includes ingredients that were once typical, particularly the pâté filling. The bacon, duck and veal is chopped and put through a mincer for a coarse mix, which is then sieved into a pâté. The rabbit fillet is left whole. This recipe has a higher proportion of meat, and much less fat.

Dough

  • 2 kg white wheat flour, t45
  • 500 g butter / lard
  • 300 ml water
  • 10 g salt

Filling

  • 1.5 kg duck, de-boned, skinned, chopped, minced
  • Duck heart, liver, chopped, minced
  • 250 g pork belly, chopped, minced
  • 150 g rabbit fillet, whole
  • 100 g veal, chopped, minced
  • 2 eggs
  • 75 g duxelles*1
  • 50 g butter
  • 30 g foie gras, diced
  • 15 g salt
  • 10 g black truffle, sliced, sautéed in butter, cooled
  • Brandy, splash
  • Water

Finish

  • Butter, for dough wash
  • Egg yolk, for, glazing
  • 30 g aspic*2

Prepare the dough a full day ahead of baking. Leave in fridge or a cold place.

Combine all the meat except the rabbit fillet in a large bowl. Add foie gras, truffles and seasoning, then the duxelles and eggs. Add brandy and some water to loosen it.*3

Divide the dough into two pieces, one to cover the inside of the terrine and one for the lid, each with a little overlap.

Stuff the filling into the terrine with the rabbit fillet in the middle, place the dough lid on top, sealing the edges.

Decorate, brush with butter and make two small holes.

A piece of rolled cardboard or foil can be used to make a funnel in each hole. This allows steam out and prevents the pâté from cracking.

Bake at 200ºC for 75 minutes, 150ºC for the last 30 minutes.

Remove chimneys and pour the aspic into the holes, allowing some to overflow.

Leave to cool, place in fridge.

*1: Sauté one chopped onion, five shallots and 25 grams of mushrooms gently in butter over a medium heat.
*2: Aspic for terrines is usually made with marrow-rich bones, usually pig and specifically trotters, slow cooked in a large pot with carrots, leeks, onions, seasoning and plenty of water, reduced, strained, clarified over a gentle bubbling heat with one egg white per 1.2 litres of stock and herbs, usually chervil and French tarragon, enriched with port of sherry, and strained again. For a dense aspic add some carrageen during the clarification stage.
*3: Hard apples peeled, cored and cubed replace the duxelles in some recipes.

Indigenous Ingredients

Duck
French Tarragon
Pork Belly
Rabbit
Shallot
Truffle
Veal